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Relative Wage Variation and Industry Location in the United Kingdom

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  • Andrew B. Bernard
  • Stephen J. Redding
  • Peter K. Schott
  • Helen Simpson

Abstract

This paper shows that both relative wages and industry structure vary considerably across regions of the United Kingdom. In accordance with the neoclassical model of trade, regions abundant in a factor (i) exhibit lower relative prices of that factor than regions scarce in the factor, and (ii) tend to specialize in a mix of industries intensive in the use of the factor. We show that this specialization leads UK regions to be asymmetrically exposed to external macroeconomic or international trade shocks. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd and the Department of Economics, University of Oxford, 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew B. Bernard & Stephen J. Redding & Peter K. Schott & Helen Simpson, 2008. "Relative Wage Variation and Industry Location in the United Kingdom," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(4), pages 431-459, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:70:y:2008:i:4:p:431-459
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    Cited by:

    1. Kiyota, Kozo, 2012. "A many-cone world?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 345-354.
    2. Neary, J. Peter & Tharakan, Joe, 2012. "International trade with endogenous mode of competition in general equilibrium," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 118-132.
    3. Lorenzo Rotunno & Adrian Wood, 2016. "Wage Inequality and Skill Supplies in a Globalised World," AMSE Working Papers 1634, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
    4. Lorenzo Rotunno & Adrian Wood, 2015. "Wages and endowments in a globalised world," Economics Papers 2015-W11, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.

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