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The Effect of Tuition Fees on University Applications and Attendance: Evidence from the UK

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  • Sa, Filipa

    () (King's College London)

Abstract

This article uses variation in university tuition fees over time and across countries in the UK to examine the effect of fees on university applications and attendance. It focuses on two policy changes: the removal of upfront tuition fees in Scotland in 2001 and the increase in fees in England in 2012. It finds that applications decrease in response to higher fees, especially for courses with lower salaries and lower employment rates after graduation. Attendance also falls in response to higher fees, but there is no evidence of a larger reduction for students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Suggested Citation

  • Sa, Filipa, 2014. "The Effect of Tuition Fees on University Applications and Attendance: Evidence from the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 8364, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8364
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Neil S. Seftor & NSarah E. Turner, 2002. "Back to School: Federal Student Aid Policy and Adult College Enrollment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(2), pages 336-352.
    2. Pietro Garibaldi & Francesco Giavazzi & Andrea Ichino & Enrico Rettore, 2012. "College Cost and Time to Complete a Degree: Evidence from Tuition Discontinuities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(3), pages 699-711, August.
    3. Susan M. Dynarski, 2003. "Does Aid Matter? Measuring the Effect of Student Aid on College Attendance and Completion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 279-288, March.
    4. repec:mpr:mprres:3250 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Chevalier, Arnaud, 2011. "Subject choice and earnings of UK graduates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1187-1201.
    6. Jacob Mincer, 1958. "Investment in Human Capital and Personal Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 281-281.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    university applications; tuition fees; university attendance;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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