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In-Work Benefits and the Nordic Model

Author

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  • Kolm, Ann-Sofie

    () (Stockholm University)

  • Tonin, Mirco

    () (Free University of Bozen/Bolzano)

Abstract

Welfare benefits in the Nordic countries are often tied to employment. We argue that this is one of the factors behind the success of the Nordic model, where a comprehensive welfare state is associated with high employment. In a general equilibrium setting, the underlining mechanism works through wage moderation and job creation. The benefits make it more important to hold a job, thus lower wages will be accepted, and more jobs created. Moreover, we show that the incentive to acquire higher education improves, further boosting employment in the long run. These positive effects help counteracting the negative impact of taxation.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolm, Ann-Sofie & Tonin, Mirco, 2012. "In-Work Benefits and the Nordic Model," IZA Discussion Papers 7084, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7084
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; unemployment; wage adjustment; in-work benefits; Nordic model; skill formation; earnings;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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