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In-work benefits across Europe

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  • Laun, Lisa

    () (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

Abstract

In-work benefits, often in the form of earned income tax credits (EITCs), have become increasingly popular over the last decades. Early versions of in-work benefits in the US, the UK and Ireland, primarily motivated as a poverty alleviation measure, have been followed by a large expansion of in-work benefits in other European countries, stressing employment goals rather than redistributive concerns. This review describes the in-work benefit schemes in a selection of countries across Europe and summarizes the evidence of these schemes. The selected countries are France, the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, Denmark, Finland and Sweden.

Suggested Citation

  • Laun, Lisa, 2019. "In-work benefits across Europe," Working Paper Series 2019:16, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2019_016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Earned income tax credit; EITC; Europe; tax and benefit system;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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