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Gender Patterns in Vietnam's Child Mortality

  • Pham, Thong Le

    (Cantho University)

  • Kooreman, Peter


    (Tilburg University)

  • Koning, Ruud H.


    (University of Groningen)

  • Wiersma, Doede

    (University of Groningen)

We analyze child mortality in Vietnam focusing on gender aspects. Contrary to several other countries in the region, mortality rates for boys are substantially larger than for girls. A large rural-urban mortality difference exists, but much more so for boys than for girls. A higher education level of the mother reduces mortality risk, but the effect is stronger for girls than for boys.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5741.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: May 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Population Economics, 2013, 26 (1), 303-322
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5741
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  1. Guilkey, David K. & Riphahn, Regina T., 1998. "The determinants of child mortality in the Philippines: estimation of a structural model," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 281-305, August.
  2. Bas Klaauw & Limin Wang, 2011. "Child mortality in rural India," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 601-628, April.
  3. Gerald Makepeace & Sarmistha Pal, 2006. "Understanding the Effects of Siblings on Child Mortality: Evidence from India," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 06-24, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  4. James Vaupel & Kenneth Manton & Eric Stallard, 1979. "The impact of heterogeneity in individual frailty on the dynamics of mortality," Demography, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 439-454, August.
  5. Cebu Study Team, 1992. "A child health production function estimated from longitudinal data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 323-351, April.
  6. M. Merli, 1998. "Mortality in Vietnam, 1979–1989," Demography, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 345-360, August.
  7. Roberto G. Gutierrez & Shana Carter & David M. Drukker, 2001. "On boundary-value likelihood-ratio tests," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 10(60).
  8. Owen O'Donnell & �ngel L�pez Nicol�s & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2007. "Growing richer and taller: Explaining Change in the Distribution of Child Nutritional Status during Vietnam’s Economic Boom," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-008/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  9. Rubiana Chamarbagwala, 2011. "Sibling composition and selective gender-based survival bias," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 935-955, July.
  10. Horton, Susan, 1988. "Birth Order and Child Nutritional Status: Evidence from the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(2), pages 341-54, January.
  11. Roberto G. Gutierrez, 2002. "Parametric frailty and shared frailty survival models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(1), pages 22-44, February.
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