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Surveying Migrant Households: A Comparison of Census-Based, Snowball, and Intercept Point Surveys

Author

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  • McKenzie, David

    () (World Bank)

  • Mistiaen, Johan

    () (World Bank)

Abstract

Few representative surveys of households of migrants exist, limiting our ability to study the effects of international migration on sending families. We report the results of an experiment designed to compare the performance of three alternative survey methods in collecting data from Japanese-Brazilian families, many of whom send migrants to Japan. The three surveys conducted were 1) Households selected randomly from a door-to-door listing using the Brazilian Census to select census blocks; 2) A snowball survey using Nikkei community groups to select the seeds; and 3) An intercept point survey collected at Nikkei community gatherings, ethnic grocery stores, sports clubs, and other locations where family members of migrants are likely to congregate. We analyze how closely well-designed snowball and intercept point surveys can approach the much more expensive census-based method in terms of giving information on the characteristics of migrants, the level of remittances received, and the incidence and determinants of return migration.

Suggested Citation

  • McKenzie, David & Mistiaen, Johan, 2007. "Surveying Migrant Households: A Comparison of Census-Based, Snowball, and Intercept Point Surveys," IZA Discussion Papers 3173, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McKenzie, David & Gibson, John & Stillman, Steven, 2006. "How important is selection ? Experimental versus non-experimental measures of the income gains from migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3906, The World Bank.
    2. Junichi Goto, 2006. "Latin Americans of the Japanese Origin (Nikkeijin) Working in Japan --- A survey," Discussion Paper Series 185, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    3. Douglas Massey & Audrey Singer, 1995. "New Estimates of Undocumented Mexican Migration and the Probability of Apprehension," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 32(2), pages 203-213, May.
    4. Tsuda, Takeyuki, 1999. "The Motivation to Migrate: The Ethnic and Sociocultural Constitution of the Japanese-Brazilian Return-Migration System," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(1), pages 1-31, October.
    5. Osili, Una Okonkwo, 2007. "Remittances and savings from international migration: Theory and evidence using a matched sample," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 446-465, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Dustmann & Francesco Fasani & Biagio Speciale, 2017. "Illegal Migration and Consumption Behavior of Immigrant Households," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 654-691.
    2. Akresh, Richard & Edmonds, Eric V., 2010. "The Analytical Returns to Measuring a Detailed Household Roster," IZA Discussion Papers 4759, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Simone Cremaschi & Carlo Devillanova, 2016. "Immigrants and Legal Status: Do Personal Contacts Matter?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1629, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Calogero Carletto & Jennica Larrison & Çaglar Özden, 2014. "Informing migration policies: a data primer," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 2, pages 9-41 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Cris Beauchemin & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2011. "Sampling international migrants with origin-based snowballing method: New evidence on biases and limitations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(3), pages 103-134, July.
    6. Ognjen Obućina, 2013. "Occupational trajectories and occupational cost among Senegalese immigrants in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(19), pages 547-580, March.
    7. Goto, Junichi, 2007. "Latin Americans of Japanese origin (Nikkeijin) working in Japan : a survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4203, The World Bank.
    8. Chort, Isabelle & Gubert, Flore & Senne, Jean-Noël, 2012. "Migrant networks as a basis for social control: Remittance incentives among Senegalese in France and Italy," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 858-874.
    9. Karunarathne, Wasana & Gibson, John, 2014. "Financial literacy and remittance behavior of skilled and unskilled immigrant groups in Australia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 54-62.
    10. John Gibson & David McKenzie & Bilal Zia, 2014. "The Impact of Financial Literacy Training for Migrants," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 28(1), pages 130-161.
    11. Jain, Tarun & Sood, Ashima, 2017. "How does relationship-based governance accommodate new entrants? Evidence from the cycle-rickshaw rental market," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(03), pages 673-697, September.
    12. Senne, Jean-Noel & Chort, Isabelle & Gubert, Flore, 2011. "Migrant Networks as a Basis for Social Control : Remittance Obligations among Senegalese in France and Italy," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 73, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    13. John Gibson & Riccardo Scarpa & Halahingano Rohorua, 2013. "Respiratory Health of Pacific Island Immigrants and Preferences for Indoor Air Quality Determinants in New Zealand," Working Papers in Economics 13/09, University of Waikato.
    14. Devillanova, Carlo & Fasani, Francesco & Frattini, Tommaso, 2014. "Employment of Undocumented Immigrants and the Prospect of Legal Status: Evidence from an Amnesty Program," IZA Discussion Papers 8151, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. David McKenzie, 2012. "Learning about migration through experiments," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1207, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rare elements; surveys; migration; intercept-point;

    JEL classification:

    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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