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Population Aging and Continued Education

Author

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  • Riphahn, Regina T.

    (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)

  • Trübswetter, Parvati

    (Institute for Employment Research (IAB), Nuremberg)

Abstract

This study investigates whether the incidence of continued vocational education has changed as the German workforce commenced an aging process which is expected to intensify. As the lifespan in productive employment, lengthens human capital investments for older workers become increasingly worthwhile. Using the data of a German population survey we describe recent trends in the development of human capital investments and apply decomposition procedures to the probability of continued education. Holding everything else constant the shift in the population age distribution by itself would have led to a decline in training participation over the considered period, 1996-2004. However, the decomposition analyses yield that behavioral changes caused an increase in training particularly among older workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Riphahn, Regina T. & Trübswetter, Parvati, 2006. "Population Aging and Continued Education," IZA Discussion Papers 2415, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2415
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2001. "Continuous training in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(3), pages 523-548.
    2. Thomas Zwick, 2005. "Continuing Vocational Training Forms and Establishment Productivity in Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(2), pages 155-184, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Guerrazzi, Marco, 2014. "Workforce ageing and the training propensity of Italian firms: cross-sectional evidence from the INDACO survey," MPRA Paper 56826, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Pfeifer, Christian & Janssen, Simon & Yang, Philip & Backes-Gellner, Uschi, 2010. "Training Participation of an Aging Workforce in an Internal Labor Market," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-447, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    3. Christian Pfeifer & Simon Janssen & Philip Yang & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2012. "Training Participation of a Firm's Aging Workforce," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0080, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    specific human capital investment; training; population aging;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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