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Returns to Foreign Education: Yet Another But Different Cross Country Analysis

  • Gruetter, Max


    (Lucerne Statistics)

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    The main interest of this paper is to compare the value of education systems of different countries. For this reason I use data on workers who have completed their education before immigrating to Switzerland to estimate a country specific return to education. I estimate the standard Mincer-equation with the extension that I additionally allow for country specific returns to education. Results show that there are important differences between the returns to different education systems within Switzerland in the value of the basic education on the one hand and the return to an additional year of education on the other hand.

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    Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1615.

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    Length: 25 pages
    Date of creation: May 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1615
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    1. McKinley L. Blackburn & David Neumark, 1991. "Omitted-Ability Bias and the Increase in the Return to Schooling," NBER Working Papers 3693, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2001. "Do Cognitive Test Scores Explain Higher US Wage Inequality?," NBER Working Papers 8210, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Philipp Bauer & Regina Riphahn, 2007. "Heterogeneity in the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: evidence from Switzerland on natives and second-generation immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 121-148, February.
    4. Augustin de Coulon, 2001. "Wage Differentials between Ethnic Groups in Switzerland," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(1), pages 111-132, 03.
    5. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    6. repec:oup:qjecon:v:107:y:1992:i:1:p:123-50 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ronald Oaxaca, 1971. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," Working Papers 396, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    8. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    9. David Card, 1994. "Earnings, Schooling, and Ability Revisited," Working Papers 710, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    10. repec:oup:qjecon:v:87:y:1973:i:3:p:355-74 is not listed on IDEAS
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