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Publication Bias and Editorial Statement on Negative Findings

Author

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  • Blanco-Perez, Cristina

    () (University of Ottawa)

  • Brodeur, Abel

    () (University of Ottawa)

Abstract

In February 2015, the editors of eight health economics journals sent out an editorial statement which aims to reduce the extent of specification searching and reminds referees to accept studies that: "have potential scientific and publication merit regardless of whether such studies' empirical findings do or do not reject null hypotheses". Guided by a pre-analysis, we test whether the editorial statement decreased the extent of publication bias. Our differences-in-differences estimates suggest that the statement decreased the proportion of tests rejecting the null hypothesis by 18 percentage points. Our findings suggest that incentives may be aligned to promote more transparent research.

Suggested Citation

  • Blanco-Perez, Cristina & Brodeur, Abel, 2019. "Publication Bias and Editorial Statement on Negative Findings," IZA Discussion Papers 12493, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12493
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alberto Abadie, 2018. "Statistical Non-Significance in Empirical Economics," NBER Working Papers 24403, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    research in economics; pre-analysis plan; specification searching; publication bias; incentives to publish;

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C44 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Operations Research; Statistical Decision Theory
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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    1. Meta-Analysis in Economics

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