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In-School Work Experience, Parental Allowances, and Wages

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  • Dustmann, Christian

    () (University College London)

  • Micklewright, John

    () (University College London)

  • van Soest, Arthur

    () (Tilburg University)

Abstract

In many industrialised countries, teenagers have a significant spending power, and they are important customers for specialised industries. The income of teenagers still in full time education comes from two major sources: parental pocket money, and earnings from part time jobs. Little is known about the way these sources interact, and how they depend on parental, school and family characteristics. In this paper, we analyse labour supply of 16 year old British teenagers together with the cash transfers made to them by their parents. We develop a theoretical model, which serves as a basis for the empirical specification in which labour supply and transfers are jointly determined. We estimate this model using unique data on labour supply of teenagers, the wages they receive, and transfers made to them by their parents. We show how these two processes depend on each other, and how transfers and labour supply react to changes in wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Dustmann, Christian & Micklewright, John & van Soest, Arthur, 2004. "In-School Work Experience, Parental Allowances, and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 1235, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1235
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-1093, Nov.-Dec..
    2. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    3. V. Joseph Hotz & Lixin Colin Xu & Marta Tienda & Avner Ahituv, 2002. "Are There Returns To The Wages Of Young Men From Working While In School?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 221-236, May.
    4. Light, Audrey, 2001. "In-School Work Experience and the Returns to Schooling," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 65-93, January.
    5. Hausman, Jerry A, 1985. "The Econometrics of Nonlinear Budget Sets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1255-1282, November.
    6. John Micklewright & Najma Rajah & Stephen Smith, 1994. "Labouring and Learning: Part-Time Work and Full-Time Education," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 148(1), pages 73-97, May.
    7. Christian Dustmann & John Mickelwright & Najma Rajah & Stephen Smith, 1996. "Earning and learning: educational policy and the growth of part-time work by full-time pupils," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(1), pages 79-103, February.
    8. Bhalotra, Sonia & Heady, Chris, 2000. "Child farm labour: theory and evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6654, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1997. "Is High School Employment Consumption or Investment?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(4), pages 735-776, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charlene Kalenkoski & Sabrina Pabilonia, 2010. "Parental transfers, student achievement, and the labor supply of college students," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 469-496, March.
    2. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:9:y:2008:i:13:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Fran├žois-Charles Wolff & Christine Barnet-Verzat, 2008. "Pocket money and child effort at school," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(13), pages 1-10.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    intra-household transfers; teenager labour supply;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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