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Early Career Research Production in Economics: Does Mentoring Matter?

Author

Listed:
  • García-Suaza, Andrés

    () (Universidad EIA)

  • Otero, Jesus

    () (Universidad del Rosario)

  • Winkelmann, Rainer

    () (University of Zurich)

Abstract

We assess the role played by advisory supervision on the early stage productivity of recent PhDs in economics using a tailor-made data set based on RePEc. After allowing for the potential effects of other relevant determinants, including gender and field of specialisation, we find as expected that both advisory quality and rank of the graduation institution are positively related to the academic productivity of graduates. However, students in top institutions do not benefit from working with the most productive academics, unless they become co-authors. For students in non-top institutions, being advised by the best academics is always associated with a higher research output. Possible explanations for this difference can be advising styles, with advisors in top-institutions devoting less time to their advisees unless they are co-authors, or a larger role of learning from peers, relative to advisors, in top-institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • García-Suaza, Andrés & Otero, Jesus & Winkelmann, Rainer, 2018. "Early Career Research Production in Economics: Does Mentoring Matter?," IZA Discussion Papers 11976, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11976
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    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp11976.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christian Zimmermann, 2013. "Academic Rankings with RePEc," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(3), pages 1-32, December.
    2. David N. Laband & Robert D. Tollison, 2000. "Intellectual Collaboration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(3), pages 632-661, June.
    3. Sharon M. Oster & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1998. "Aging And Productivity Among Economists," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 154-156, February.
    4. Philip Hans Franses, 2003. "The diffusion of scientific publications: The case of Econometrica, 1987," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 56(1), pages 29-42, January.
    5. repec:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:7:p:1647-1665 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Andrew J. Oswald, 2007. "An Examination of the Reliability of Prestigious Scholarly Journals: Evidence and Implications for Decision‐Makers," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(293), pages 21-31, February.
    7. Fok, Dennis & Franses, Philip Hans, 2007. "Modeling the diffusion of scientific publications," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 139(2), pages 376-390, August.
    8. repec:tpr:restat:v:100:y:2018:i:1:p:45-50 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Lorenzo Ductor & Marcel Fafchamps & Sanjeev Goyal & Marco J. van der Leij, 2014. "Social Networks and Research Output," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(5), pages 936-948, December.
    10. Colussi, Tommaso, 2015. "Social Ties in Academia: A Friend is a Treasure," IZA Discussion Papers 9414, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Donna K. Ginther & Shulamit Kahn, 2004. "Women in Economics: Moving Up or Falling Off the Academic Career Ladder?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 193-214, Summer.
    12. repec:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:5:p:141-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Broström, Anders, 2019. "Academic breeding grounds: Home department conditions and early career performance of academic researchers," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(7), pages 1647-1665.
    14. Christiana Hilmer & Michael Hilmer, 2007. "Women Helping Women, Men Helping Women? Same-Gender Mentoring, Initial Job Placements, and Early Career Publishing Success for Economics PhDs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 422-426, May.
    15. Lorenzo Ductor, 2015. "Does Co-authorship Lead to Higher Academic Productivity?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 77(3), pages 385-407, June.
    16. Dan Johnson, 1997. "Getting Noticed in Economics: The Determinants of Academic Citations," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 41(1), pages 43-52, March.
    17. William J. Baumol, 1997. "On the Pleasures and Gains of Collaboration," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 41(1), pages 15-21, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    academic career; research performance; RePEC; economic research;

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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