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Skills, Scope, and Success: An Empirical Look at the Start-up Process in Creative Industries in Germany

Author

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  • Kohn, Karsten

    () (KfW Bankengruppe)

  • Wewel, Solvejg A.

    () (Boston College)

Abstract

Creative industries comprise enterprises focusing on the creation, production, and distribution of creative or cultural goods and services. Following an explorative empirical approach, we analyze start-ups in creative industries regarding three issues along the start-up process: (1) personal characteristics of creative entrepreneurs, (2) their use of labor and capital as input factors, and (3) start-up success as measured by start-up survival, degree of innovativeness, and change in household income. Based on individual-level data from the KfW Start-up Monitor, a large-scale survey on entrepreneurship in Germany, our regression results show that entrepreneurs in creative industries tend to be younger and better educated than entrepreneurs in other economic sectors. Businesses in creative industries are prevalently started on a small scale, as part-time occupations, and with less financial resources. Yet they show a higher persistence and an above-average degree of innovativeness.

Suggested Citation

  • Kohn, Karsten & Wewel, Solvejg A., 2018. "Skills, Scope, and Success: An Empirical Look at the Start-up Process in Creative Industries in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 11650, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11650
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. C. Praag & Peter Versloot, 2007. "What is the value of entrepreneurship? A review of recent research," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 351-382, December.
    2. Pratt, Andy C., 2008. "Creative cities: the cultural industries and the creative class," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20704, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Bruce A Seaman, 2011. "Economic Impact of the Arts," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition, chapter 28 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Jason Potts & Stuart Cunningham & John Hartley & Paul Ormerod, 2008. "Social network markets: a new definition of the creative industries," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 32(3), pages 167-185, September.
    5. C. Mirjam van Praag, 2003. "Business Survival and Success of Young Small Business Owners," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-050/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    6. Richard Swedberg, 2006. "The cultural entrepreneur and the creative industries: beginning in Vienna," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 30(4), pages 243-261, December.
    7. Ann Markusen, 2006. "Urban development and the politics of a creative class: evidence from a study of artists," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 38(10), pages 1921-1940, October.
    8. Mark Granovetter, 2005. "The Impact of Social Structure on Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 33-50, Winter.
    9. Allen Scott, 2006. "Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Industrial Development: Geography and the Creative Field Revisited," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 1-24, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    creative industries; cultural industries; entrepreneurship; business start-ups; start-up decision; start-up success; innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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