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Information Frictions and Learning Dynamics: Evidence from Tax Avoidance in Ecuador

Author

Listed:
  • Bohne, Albrecht

    () (University of Mannheim)

  • Nimczik, Jan Sebastian

    () (Humboldt University Berlin)

Abstract

We show how experience and dynamic learning processes reduce the obstacles to optimization imposed by information frictions when individuals newly enter the formal sector economy. Most importantly, we provide causal evidence on the exact mechanisms through which individuals learn about the functioning of government programs. To this aim, we exploit novel and rich administrative data on the universe of taxpayers in Ecuador and the introduction of generous tax deduction policies. Key to the identification of information transmission is exogenous worker mobility between firms. We find that the spread of information is driven by mobility of managers and tax experts.

Suggested Citation

  • Bohne, Albrecht & Nimczik, Jan Sebastian, 2018. "Information Frictions and Learning Dynamics: Evidence from Tax Avoidance in Ecuador," IZA Discussion Papers 11536, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11536
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Doerrenberg & Andreas Peichl, 2017. "Tax morale and the role of social norms and reciprocity - Evidence from a randomized survey experiment," ifo Working Paper Series 242, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    learning; tax avoidance; information frictions; taxation and development; bunching; behavioral responses to taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H32 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Firm
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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