IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp11104.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Mode of Entry into Hybrid Entrepreneurship: New Venture Start-Up versus Business Takeover

Author

Listed:
  • Xi, Guoqian

    () (University of Trier)

  • Block, Jörn

    () (University of Trier)

  • Lasch, Frank

    () (Montpellier Business School)

  • Robert, Frank

    () (Montpellier Business School)

  • Thurik, Roy

    () (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Abstract

Many entrepreneurs start their ventures while retaining jobs in wage employment; this phenomenon is called hybrid entrepreneurship. Little is known about the entry modes (new venture start-up vs. business takeover) of hybrid entrepreneurs. Our study aims to close this gap by investigating the path to hybrid entrepreneurship. Using a large sample of French hybrid entrepreneurs, we show that educational attainment and management experience are associated with new venture start-up, whereas being female, having worker experience, and having received social benefits are linked to business takeover. With these results, our study contributes to research on hybrid entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship entry modes. Moreover, it informs policy makers about the nature of hybrid entrepreneurship and contributes to the design of effective policies to promote business takeover, which is of high interest, given the growing number of businesses seeking outside successors.

Suggested Citation

  • Xi, Guoqian & Block, Jörn & Lasch, Frank & Robert, Frank & Thurik, Roy, 2017. "Mode of Entry into Hybrid Entrepreneurship: New Venture Start-Up versus Business Takeover," IZA Discussion Papers 11104, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11104
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp11104.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Françoise Bastié & Sylvie Cieply & Pascal Cussy, 2013. "The entrepreneur's mode of entry: the effect of social and financial capital," Post-Print halshs-00658182, HAL.
    2. Jörn H. Block & Andreas Landgraf, 2016. "Transition from part-time entrepreneurship to full-time entrepreneurship: the role of financial and non-financial motives," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 259-282, March.
    3. King, Gary & Zeng, Langche, 2001. "Logistic Regression in Rare Events Data," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(02), pages 137-163, January.
    4. Sam Youl Lee & Richard Florida & Zoltan Acs, 2004. "Creativity and Entrepreneurship: A Regional Analysis of New Firm Formation," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(8), pages 879-891.
    5. Vera Rocha & Anabela Carneiro & Celeste Varum, 2015. "Entry and exit dynamics of nascent business owners," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 63-84, June.
    6. Åstebro, Thomas & Chen, Jing, 2014. "The entrepreneurial earnings puzzle: Mismeasurement or real?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 88-105.
    7. Schulz, Matthias & Urbig, Diemo & Procher, Vivien, 2016. "Hybrid entrepreneurship and public policy: The case of firm entry deregulation," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 272-286.
    8. Françoise Bastié & Sylvie Cieply & Pascal Cussy, 2013. "The entrepreneur’s mode of entry: the effect of social and financial capital," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 865-877, May.
    9. Levesque, Moren & Schade, Christian, 2005. "Intuitive optimizing: experimental findings on time allocation decisions with newly formed ventures," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 313-342, May.
    10. Parker, Simon C, 2009. "Why do small firms produce the entrepreneurs?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 484-494, June.
    11. Marco Gelderen & Roy Thurik & Niels Bosma, 2006. "Success and Risk Factors in the Pre-Startup Phase," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 319-335, May.
    12. Kameliia Petrova, 2012. "Part-time entrepreneurship and financial constraints: evidence from the Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 473-493, September.
    13. repec:eee:jobuve:v:5:y:2016:i:c:p:14-18 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Jonas Debrulle & Johan Maes, 2015. "Start-ups' Internationalization: The Impact of Business Owners' Management Experience, Start-up Experience and Professional Network on Export Intensity," Post-Print hal-01563020, HAL.
    15. Burmeister-Lamp, Katrin & Lévesque, Moren & Schade, Christian, 2012. "Are entrepreneurs influenced by risk attitude, regulatory focus or both? An experiment on entrepreneurs' time allocation," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 456-476.
    16. Rees, Hedley & Shah, Anup, 1986. "An Empirical Analysis of Self-employment in the U.K," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(1), pages 95-108, January.
    17. Francesco Renna, 2006. "Moonlighting and Overtime: A Cross-Country Analysis," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 27(4), pages 575-591, October.
    18. Barton H. Hamilton, 2000. "Does Entrepreneurship Pay? An Empirical Analysis of the Returns to Self-Employment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(3), pages 604-631, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    hybrid entrepreneurship; entrepreneurship entry mode; business takeover; new venture;

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11104. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.