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Multilateral Trade and Agricultural Policy Reforms in Sugar Markets (Revised)

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  • Elobeid, Amani
  • Beghin, John C.

Abstract

We analyze the impact of trade liberalization, removal of production subsidies, and elimination of consumption distortions in world sugar markets using a partial-equilibrium international sugar model calibrated on 2002 market data and current policies. The removal of trade distortions alone induces a 27% price increase while the removal of all trade and production distortions induces a 48% increase by 2011/12 relative to the baseline. Aggregate trade expands moderately, but location of production and trade patterns change substantially. Protectionist OECD countries (the EU, Japan, the US) experience an import expansion or export reduction and significant contraction in production in unfettered markets. Competitive producers in both OECD countries (Australia) and non-OECD countries (Brazil, Cuba), and even some protected producers (Indonesia, Turkey), expand production when all distortions are removed. Consumption distortions have marginal impacts on world markets and location of production. We discuss the significance of these results in the context of mounting pressures to increase market access in highly protected OECD countries and the impact on non-OECD countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Elobeid, Amani & Beghin, John C., 2005. "Multilateral Trade and Agricultural Policy Reforms in Sugar Markets (Revised)," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12419, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:12419
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Ataman Aksoy & John C. Beghin, 2005. "Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7464, September.
    2. S¯ren E. Frandsen & Hans G. Jensen & Wusheng Yu & Aage Walter-J¯rgensen, 2003. "Reform of EU sugar policy: price cuts versus quota reductions," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 1-26, March.
    3. John C. Beghin & Barbara El Osta & Jay R. Cherlow & Samarendu Mohanty, 2003. "The Cost Of The U.S. Sugar Program Revisited," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(1), pages 106-116, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amani Elobeid & John Beghin, 2006. "Multilateral Trade and Agricultural Policy Reforms in Sugar Markets," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 23-48, March.
    2. Surabhi Mittal & Jeffrey J. Reimer, 2008. "Would Indian farmers benefit from liberalization of world cotton and sugar markets?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 301-312, May.
    3. Jo Lorentzen & Anton Cartwright & Charles Meth, 2010. "Trade Liberalization, Rural Poverty and the Environment: A Case Study of Sugarcane Production in the Incomati River Basin in Mpumalanga, South Africa," Chapters,in: Vulnerable Places, Vulnerable People, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. repec:wsi:medjxx:v:03:y:2011:i:02:n:s1793812011000405 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Elbehri, Aziz & Umstaetter, Johannes & Kelch, David R., 2008. "The EU Sugar Policy Regime and Implications of Reform," Economic Research Report 56457, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.

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