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On the Link Between On-the-Job Training and Earnings Dispersion

Listed author(s):
  • Said Hanchane

    ()

    (Institut d’Economie Publique (IDEP), Marseille, and Laboratoire d’Economie et de Sociologie du Travail (LEST), Aix-en-Provence)

  • Jacques Silber

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University, Israel, and Institut d’Economie Publique (IDEP), Marseille)

This paper is a first attempt to devise a methodology that allows estimating the exact impact of training on the dispersion of wages. It uses an approach originally proposed by Fields (2003) but extends it to the breakdown of inequality by population subgroups as well as to the case where the earnings function that is at the base of the analysis has to be adjusted for selectivity bias. The empirical illustration is based on a survey conducted in France at the end of the twentieth century.

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File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0023_lhwpaper.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW) in its series Economics of Education Working Paper Series with number 0023.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2007
Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0023
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  1. Karoly, Lynn A, 1992. "Changes in the Distribution of Individual Earnings in the United States: 1967-1986," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 107-115, February.
  2. Lawrence F. Katz & Kevin M. Murphy, 1992. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963–1987: Supply and Demand Factors," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 35-78.
  3. Saïd Hanchane & François Stankiewicz, 2004. "Propositions pour une théorie organisationnelle de la formation : les enseignements de l'enquête Formation continue 2000," Working Papers halshs-00010249, HAL.
  4. Richard Blundell & Lorraine Dearden & Costas Meghir & Barbara Sianesi, 1999. "Human capital investment: the returns from education and training to the individual, the firm and the economy," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 20(1), pages 1-23, March.
  5. Dickens, William T & Lang, Kevin, 1985. "A Test of Dual Labor Market Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 792-805, September.
  6. Dominique Goux & Éric Maurin, 1997. "Les entreprises, les salariés et la formation continue," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 306(1), pages 41-55.
  7. Dave E. Marcotte, 2000. "Continuing Education, Job Training, and the Growth of Earnings Inequality," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(4), pages 602-623, July.
  8. Per Krusell & Lee E. Ohanian & JosÈ-Victor RÌos-Rull & Giovanni L. Violante, 2000. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality: A Macroeconomic Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(5), pages 1029-1054, September.
  9. James Heckman & Lance Lochner & Christopher Taber, 1998. "Explaining Rising Wage Inequality: Explanations With A Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Labor Earnings With Heterogeneous Agents," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(1), pages 1-58, January.
  10. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-1381, September.
  11. Dominique Goux & Éric Maurin, 1994. "Éducation, expérience et salaire," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 116(5), pages 155-178.
  12. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
  13. Magnac, Th, 1991. "Segmented or Competitive Labor Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(1), pages 165-187, January.
  14. Bound, John & Johnson, George, 1992. "Changes in the Structure of Wages in the 1980's: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 371-392, June.
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