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JRC PESETA III Project: Economic integration and spillover analysis

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This report details the economic integration of the biophysical impact results of the JRC PESETA III project. Six impact areas have been fully integrated: labour productivity, river floods, coastal floods, energy, agriculture and human mortality due to heatwaves. A second objective of the economic task has been to explore the degree to which climate impacts cross geographical borders, the so-called spillover analysis. The global transboundary analysis has been made for the four sectors for which global impact estimates are available: labour productivity, river floods, energy, and agriculture. This document presents the methodology and main results of the economic assessment.

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  • Wojciech Szewczyk & Juan Carlos Ciscar Martinez & Ignazio Mongelli & Antonio Soria Ramirez, 2018. "JRC PESETA III Project: Economic integration and spillover analysis," JRC Working Papers JRC113810, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  • Handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc113810
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    File URL: https://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC113810
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    Keywords

    climate change; warming; economics; damage;
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