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Teenage truancy, part-time working and wages


  • Christian Dustmann

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London)

  • Najma Rajah

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies)


Part-time work whilst still in full-time education is common in many industrialized countries, and teenagers constitute a significant component of the work force in some sectors of the labour market. In Britain, in the early 1990's, some 60 percent of 16-18 year olds still in full time education also worked part-time. Although the determinants of teenager participation in the labour market have been studied previously (both in the US and the UK), there remain a number of neglected questions. We address some of these in this paper, basing our analysis on data taken from the UK National Child Development Study. We first examine how teenagers divide their time between working and studying. We further analyse what explains teenage wages and labour supply. We utilise a rich set of variables describing parental background, as well as parents' labour force status and draw on information on physical stature to explain variations in wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Dustmann & Najma Rajah, 1997. "Teenage truancy, part-time working and wages," IFS Working Papers W97/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:97/13

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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Ambrose Leung, 2004. "Delinquency, schooling, and work: time allocation decision of youth," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 987-993.
    2. Amy Peng & Ling Yang, 2009. "The Decision of Work and Study and Employment Outcomes," Working Papers 014, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
    3. Kooreman, Peter, 2005. "The Persistent Segregation of Girls into Lower-Paying Jobs while in School," IZA Discussion Papers 1535, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Simon Burgess & Karen Gardiner & Carol Propper, 2002. "The Economic Determinants of Truancy," CASE Papers case61, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    5. Charlene Kalenkoski & Sabrina Pabilonia, 2010. "Parental transfers, student achievement, and the labor supply of college students," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 469-496, March.
    6. Kevin Denny, 2004. "Born to be wild? The effect of birth order, families and schools on truancy (Version 3.2)," Working Papers 200421, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    7. Steven Bradley & Robert Crouchley, 2017. "The effects of test scores and truancy on youth unemployment and inactivity: A simultaneous equations approach," Working Papers 189398493, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    8. Kooreman, Peter, 2009. "The early inception of labor market gender differences," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 135-139, April.
    9. Jo Sparkes, 1999. "Schools, Education and Social Exclusion," CASE Papers 029, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    10. John Hobcraft, 2000. "The Roles of Schooling and Educational Qualifications in the Emergence of Adult Social Exclusion," CASE Papers case43, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    11. Kevin Denny, 2004. "Born to be wild? The effect of birth order, families and schools on truancy (Version 4.0)," Open Access publications 10197/1107, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    12. Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia, 2000. "The Role of the Family in Determining Youth Employment," JCPR Working Papers 151, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    13. repec:ucn:wpaper:10197/1107 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials


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