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Unexpected consequences of liberalisation: metering, losses, load profiles and cost settlement in Spain’s electricity system

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  • Joan Batalla-Bejerano

    () (Rovira i Virgili University)

  • Maria Teresa Costa-Campi

    () (University of Barcelona & IEB)

  • Elisa Trujillo-Baute

    () (University of Warwick & IEB)

Abstract

European energy markets have undergone a major transformation as they have advanced towards market liberalisation and it is vital that the details of these developments be carefully examined. The success of liberalisation is based on smart regulation, which has been capable of providing solutions to unforeseen events in the process. Our paper seeks to contribute to existing understanding of the unexpected consequences of the liberalisation process in the power system by examining a natural experiment that occurred in Spain in 2009. In that year, the electricity supply by distribution system operators (DSOs) disappeared. This positive change in retail market competition, as we demonstrate in this paper, has had an unexpected effect in terms of the system’s balancing requirements. We undertake a rigorous assessment of the economic consequences of this policy change for the whole system, in terms of its impact on final electricity prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Joan Batalla-Bejerano & Maria Teresa Costa-Campi & Elisa Trujillo-Baute, 2015. "Unexpected consequences of liberalisation: metering, losses, load profiles and cost settlement in Spain’s electricity system," Working Papers 2015/16, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  • Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:doc2015-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Antonelli, Marco & Desideri, Umberto & Franco, Alessandro, 2018. "Effects of large scale penetration of renewables: The Italian case in the years 2008–2015," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 81(P2), pages 3090-3100.
    2. Kaller, Alexander & Bielen, Samantha & Marneffe, Wim, 2018. "The impact of regulatory quality and corruption on residential electricity prices in the context of electricity market reforms," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 514-524.
    3. Gianfreda, Angelica & Parisio, Lucia & Pelagatti, Matteo, 2018. "A review of balancing costs in Italy before and after RES introduction," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 549-563.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Electricity market design; balancing services; electricity market balance; liberalization; natural experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • D47 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Market Design
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting

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