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Controlling for Demand Side Factors and Job Matching: Maximum Likelihood Estimates of the Returns to Seniority Using Matched Employer-Employee Data




In this paper, we match firm data to work history files in order to simultaneously estimate the wage and employment duration processes of a longitudinal sample of two million French workers employed in roughly one million firms and followed over twenty years. We use the particular structure of the data set to distinguish the impact of job search and labor demand indicators on wages and employment at the job level for the first time. Our model allows for correlated individual and job unobserved heterogeneity. Controlling for job matching, we find that returns to seniority are close to zero.

Suggested Citation

  • Benoit Dostie, 2003. "Controlling for Demand Side Factors and Job Matching: Maximum Likelihood Estimates of the Returns to Seniority Using Matched Employer-Employee Data," Cahiers de recherche 03-02, HEC Montréal, Institut d'économie appliquée.
  • Handle: RePEc:iea:carech:0302

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-679, June.
    2. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1999. "High Wage Workers and High Wage Firms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(2), pages 251-334, March.
    3. Joseph G. Altonji & Robert A. Shakotko, 1987. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 437-459.
    4. Joseph G. Altonji & Nicolas Williams, 2005. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority? A Reassessment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(3), pages 370-397, April.
    5. Eli Berman & John Bound & Zvi Griliches, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U. S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-397.
    6. Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 145-176, February.
    7. Abraham, Katharine G & Farber, Henry S, 1987. "Job Duration, Seniority, and Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 278-297, June.
    8. Ana L. Revenga, 1992. "Exporting Jobs?The Impact of Import Competition on Employment and Wages in U. S. Manufacturing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 255-284.
    9. repec:adr:anecst:y:1999:i:55-56:p:07 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Simon D Woodcock, 2002. "Agent Heterogeneity and Learning: An Application to Labor Markets," Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers 2002-20, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    More about this item


    Endogeneity; Job duration; Wage determination; Unobserved heterogeneity; Labor demand; Maximum likelihood.;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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