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The Politics of Federalism in Argentina: Implications for Governance and Accountability

  • Martin Ardanaz
  • Marcelo Leiras
  • Mariano Tommasi

This paper contributes to an agenda that views the effects of policies and institutional reforms as dependent on the structure of political incentives for national and subnational political actors. The paper studies political incentive structures at the subnational level and the mechanisms whereby they affect national-level politics and policymaking at the national level in Argentina, a highly decentralized middle-income democracy, Argentina. The Argentine political system makes subnational political power structures very influential in national politics. Moreover, most Argentine provinces are local bastions of power dominated by entrenched elites, characterized by scarce political competition, weak division of powers, and clientelistic political linkages. Political dominance in the provinces and political importance at the national level reinforce each other, dragging the Argentine political and policymaking system towards the practices and features of its most politically backward regions.

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4781.

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Date of creation: Jun 2012
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4781
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  1. Alberto Porto & Pablo Sanguinetti, 2001. "Political Determinants of Intergovernmental Grants: Evidence From Argentina," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(3), pages 237-256, November.
  2. Cai, Hongbin & Treisman, Daniel, 2004. "State corroding federalism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3-4), pages 819-843, March.
  3. Michael A. Bailey, 2007. "Constraining Federalism: Formalizing Expectations about Redistributive Policies in Decentralized Systems," Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(2), pages 135-159, Spring.
  4. Pablo T. Spiller, 2003. "The Institutional Foundations of Public Policy: A Transactions Approach with Application to Argentina," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 281-306, October.
  5. Allyson L. Benton, 2009. "What Makes Strong Federalism Seem Weak? Fiscal Resources and Presidential-Provincial Relations in Argentina," Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(4), pages 651-676, Fall.
  6. Valeria Palanza & Carlos Scartascini & Mariano Tommasi, 2012. "On the Institutionalization of Congress(es) in Latin America and Beyond," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 78580, Inter-American Development Bank.
  7. Weingast, Barry R, 1995. "The Economic Role of Political Institutions: Market-Preserving Federalism and Economic Development," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 1-31, April.
  8. Hongbin Cai & Daniel Treisman, 2005. "Does Competition for Capital Discipline Governments? Decentralization, Globalization, and Public Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 817-830, June.
  9. Rafael Di Tella & Ignacio Franceschelli, 2011. "Government Advertising and Media Coverage of Corruption Scandals," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 119-51, October.
  10. repec:idb:brikps:34665 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. Carlos Scartascini & Ernesto H. Stein & Mariano Tommasi & Mark P. Jones & Sebastián Saiegh & Mariana Magaldi de Sousa & Cecilia Martínez-Gallardo & Laura Zuvanic & Mercedes Iacoviello & Ana Laura Rodr, 2010. "How Democracy Works: Political Institutions, Actors and Arenas in Latin American Policymaking," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 34665 edited by Carlos Scartascini & Ernesto Stein & Mariano Tommasi, October.
  12. Yingyi Qian & Barry R. Weingast, 1997. "Federalism as a Commitment to Preserving Market Incentives," Working Papers 97042, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  13. Dixit, Avinash & Londregan, John, 1998. "Fiscal federalism and redistributive politics," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 153-180, May.
  14. Carlos Scartascini & Mariano Tommasi, 2009. "The Making of Policy: Institutionalized or Not?," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 5379, Inter-American Development Bank.
  15. Mark P. Jones & Osvaldo Meloni & Mariano Tommasi, 2012. "Voters as Fiscal Liberals: Incentives and Accountability in Federal Systems," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(2), pages 135-156, 07.
  16. José Bercoff & Osvaldo Meloni, 2009. "Federal budget allocation in an emergent democracy: evidence from Argentina," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 65-83, January.
  17. Myerson, Roger B., 2006. "Federalism and Incentives for Success of Democracy," Quarterly Journal of Political Science, now publishers, vol. 1(1), pages 3-23, January.
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