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Hasta que punto los latinoamericanos conf'ian y cooperan? Experimentos de campo sobre exclusión social en seis países de América Latina

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  • Alberto Chong
  • Hugo Ñopo
  • Juan Camilo Cardenas

Abstract

Este documento investiga hasta que punto las personas confían, reciprocan, cooperan y comparten riesgos. El estudio se llevó a cabo en seis ciudades de América Latina aplicando una serie de experimentos de campo que incluían el juego de confianza, el mecanismo de contribuciones voluntarias y tres juegos de riesgo compartido. Los resultados sugieren que: (i) en promedio, la propensión de los latinoamericanos a confiar y a cooperar es notablemente similar a la de otras regiones del mundo; (ii) la expectativa sobre el comportamiento de los demás es el principal motivador de confianza, reciprocidad y cooperación, y (iii) los comportamientos que incluyen socialización, confianza y cooperación están íntimamente vinculados.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Chong & Hugo Ñopo & Juan Camilo Cardenas, 2008. "Hasta que punto los latinoamericanos conf'ian y cooperan? Experimentos de campo sobre exclusión social en seis países de América Latina," Research Department Publications 4578, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4578
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    References listed on IDEAS

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