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Oltre l’egoismo: L’approccio comportamentale alle preferenze

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  • Papa Stefano

Abstract

Questo lavoro illustra come la letteratura economica secondo l’approccio comportamentale ha affrontato il problema delle preferenze che riguardano gli altri. Si propone di elaborare una rassegna su come le preferenze non egoistiche si inseriscono nella funzione di utilità.

Suggested Citation

  • Papa Stefano, 2011. "Oltre l’egoismo: L’approccio comportamentale alle preferenze," wp.comunite 0077, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ter:wpaper:0077
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    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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