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Job Stability and Labor Mobility in Urban Mexico: A Study Based on Duration Models and Transition Analysis

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  • Angel Calderon Madrid

Abstract

Can the relatively slow growth of the formal sector in Mexico during the 1990s be attributed to a rigid labor market and to low turnover rates? Is the increasing share of workers in the informal sector and of self-employed workers evidence of market segmentation, and hence a source of inequality and poverty? Or, as suggested by Maloney (1997), could the relatively large and symmetric flows of workers among all sectors (formal, informal, self-employed, unemployed, etc. ) be more consistent with a well-integrated market where workers search across sectors for job opportunities than one where informal workers seek permanent status in the formal sector and stay until they retire?[1] [1] Maloney, (1997, p. 13).

Suggested Citation

  • Angel Calderon Madrid, 2000. "Job Stability and Labor Mobility in Urban Mexico: A Study Based on Duration Models and Transition Analysis," Research Department Publications 3117, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:3117
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-679, June.
    2. Farber, Henry S, 1994. "The Analysis of Interfirm Worker Mobility," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(4), pages 554-593, October.
    3. Christopher J. Flinn & James J. Heckman, 1982. "Models for the Analysis of Labor Force Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 0857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Daniel Cohen & Arnaud Lefranc & Gilles Saint-Paul, 1997. "French unemployment: a transatlantic perspective," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 12(25), pages 265-292, October.
    5. Revenga, Ana & Riboud, Michelle & Tan, Hong, 1994. "The Impact of Mexico's Retraining Program on Employment and Wages," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(2), pages 247-277, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aysit Tansel & Elif Öznur Acar, 2017. "Labor mobility across the formal/informal divide in Turkey: Evidence from individual-level data," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(4), pages 617-635, September.
    2. Sílvio Rendon & Alfredo Cuecuecha, 2010. "International job search: Mexicans in and out of the US," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 53-82, March.
    3. Miguel Jaramillo & Jaime Saavedra, 2005. "Severance Payment Programs in Latin America," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 275-307, September.
    4. Julie Anderson Schaffner, 2001. "Turnover and Job Training in Developing and Developed Countries: Evidence from Colombia and the United States," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-115, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    5. Eliane El Badaoui & Eric Strobl & Frank Walsh, 2008. "Is There an Informal Employment Wage Penalty? Evidence from South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 683-710.

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