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The Effects of Parents Cigarette and Alcohol Consumption on Their Children's Time Use and Educational Attainment

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The objective of this study is to estimate the effect of parents alcohol and cigarette use on time use and educational attainment of their children. We use data from the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS), an annual panel survey from 1995-2004. We find that both maternal and paternal cigarette consumption have adverse effects on reading and educational attainment. Parents consumption of alcohol does not appear to have effects on reading or educational attainment but does have effects on the number of hours spent watching TV. We implement a bounds analysis of selection and find that these effects are plausibly causal.

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  • Partha Deb & Eugenia Priedane, 2007. "The Effects of Parents Cigarette and Alcohol Consumption on Their Children's Time Use and Educational Attainment," Economics Working Paper Archive at Hunter College 420, Hunter College Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:htr:hcecon:420
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    File URL: http://econ.hunter.cuny.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/RePEc/papers/HunterEconWP420.pdf
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