IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hst/ghsdps/gd10-182.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Tajik Labour Migrants and their Remittances: Is Tajik Migration Pro-Poor?

Author

Listed:
  • Kazuhiro Kumo

Abstract

For the four years since 2006, Tajikistan, a former Soviet republic, has led the world in the receipt of foreign remittance as a proportion of GDP. Needless to say, key reasons for this are the low income levels in Tajikistan and the country's special relationship with Russia, which is enjoying rapid economic growth. Yet while interest in the relationship between migration and foreign remittance has existed for a long time, not many studies have looked at this region. This paper used household survey forms from two points in time to profile households in Tajikistan and international labour migration by Tajiks, and examined the relationship between household income levels in Tajikistan, the poorest of the former Soviet republics, and foreign remittance being received from international labour migrants and the likelihood of migrants being supplied. It found no correlation between household income levels and amounts of money received from abroad, which suggests that altruistic models of the relationship between migration and remittance do not apply. Moreover, it also found that households with high incomes are more likely to supply migrants, indicating that international labour migration from Tajikistan may not be conductive to reducing poverty in that country.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazuhiro Kumo, 2011. "Tajik Labour Migrants and their Remittances: Is Tajik Migration Pro-Poor?," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd10-182, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hst:ghsdps:gd10-182
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://gcoe.ier.hit-u.ac.jp/research/discussion/2008/pdf/gd10-182.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Krishnan Sharma, 2009. "The Impact of Remittances on Economic Insecurity," Working Papers 78, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    2. Ryazantsev, Sergei V. & Horie, Norio & Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2010. "Migrant Workers from Central Asia into the Russian Federation," CEI Working Paper Series 2010-1, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Vakulenko, Elena & Leukhin, Roman, 2015. "Investigation of demand for the foreign workforce in Russian regions using applications for quotas," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 37(1), pages 67-86.
    2. Tokunaga, Masahiro & Suganuma, Keiko & Odagiri, Nami, 2018. "From Russia to Eurasia : Specific Features of the “Russosphere” from the Perspective of Business Activities of Japanese Firms," RRC Working Paper Series 77, Russian Research Center, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Köllner, Sebastian, 2013. "Remittances and educational attainment: Evidence from Tajikistan," Discussion Paper Series 124, Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, Chair of Economic Order and Social Policy.
    4. Iwasaki, Ichiro, 2018. "International Presence of the Japanese Study of Russian and East European Economies," RRC Working Paper Series 74, Russian Research Center, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    5. Hiwatari, Masato, 2016. "Social networks and migration decisions: The influence of peer effects in rural households in Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 1115-1131.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • P46 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hst:ghsdps:gd10-182. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Tatsuji Makino). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iehitjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.