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Social networks and migration decisions: The influence of peer effects in rural households in Central Asia

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  • Hiwatari, Masato

Abstract

This study examines the influence of social networks on household decisions to emigrate from rural Central Asia. It identifies the peer effects of social networks by using a unique and detailed dataset derived from the author's field survey in a rural village in a post-Soviet Central Asian country. Extended versions of spatial autoregressive models are then estimated by using the generalized spatial two-stage least squares method. The empirical results suggest that peer effects positively influence household decisions to emigrate, whereas network position does not. It is suggested the existence of intense social networks, which can be sources of spillover effects, might increase migration from the village society.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiwatari, Masato, 2016. "Social networks and migration decisions: The influence of peer effects in rural households in Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 1115-1131.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:44:y:2016:i:4:p:1115-1131
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jce.2016.10.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Guest Editors Byung-Yeon & Kutan, Ali M., 2016. "Economic agents in transition: Firm owners and households," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 1084-1085.
    2. Iwasaki, Ichiro, 2018. "International Presence of the Japanese Study of Russian and East European Economies," RRC Working Paper Series 74, Russian Research Center, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social networks; Migration; Spatial autoregressive models; Transition economies;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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