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Determinants of Global and Intra-European Imbalances

  • Gunther Schnabl


    (Institute for Economic Policy, University of Leipzig)

  • Stephan Freitag


    (Institute for Economic Policy, University of Leipzig)

The paper discusses global current account imbalances in the context of an asymmetric world monetary system and asymmetric current account developments. It identifies the US and Germany as center countries with rising / high current account deficits (US) and surpluses (Germany). These are matched by current account surpluses of countries stabilizing their exchange rates against the dollar (dollar periphery) and current account deficits of countries stabilizing their exchange rate against the euro or members of the euro area (euro periphery). The paper finds that changes of world current account positions are closely linked to the monetary policy decision patterns both in the centers and peripheries. Whereas in the centers current account positions are affected by monetary policies, in the peripheries exchange rate stabilization cum sterilization matters. In specific, monetary expansion in the US as well as exchange rate stabilization and sterilization policies in the dollar periphery are found to have contributed to global imbalances.

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Paper provided by Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena in its series Global Financial Markets Working Paper Series with number 25-2011.

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Date of creation: 28 May 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hlj:hljwrp:25-2011
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  1. Blundell, R. & Bond, S., 1995. "Initial Conditions and Moment Restrictions in Dynamic Panel Data Models," Economics Papers 104, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  2. David Roodman, 2009. "How to do xtabond2: An introduction to difference and system GMM in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 9(1), pages 86-136, March.
  3. Schnabl, Gunther & Hoffmann, Andreas, 2007. "Monetary Policy, Vagabonding Liquidity and Bursting Bubbles in New and Emerging Markets - An Overinvestment View," MPRA Paper 5201, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Juann H. Hung & Edward N. Gamber, 2010. "An Absorption Approach to Modeling the US Current Account," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(2), pages 334-350, 05.
  5. Sabine Herrmann & Adalbert Winkler, 2009. "Financial markets and the current account: emerging Europe versus emerging Asia," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 145(3), pages 531-550, October.
  6. Sajal Lahiri & A. K. M. Mahbub Morshed, 2010. "Current Account Imbalances and Foreign Investment: A Theoretical Analysis of Interrelationships and Causalities," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(2), pages 369-381, 05.
  7. Gunther Schnabl & Stephan Freitag, 2009. "Policy Implications of Global Asymmetric Current Account Positions," Review of Economics, Lucius & Lucius, vol. 60(2), pages 103-137.
  8. Martin Feldstein, 2008. "Resolving the Global Imbalance: The Dollar and the U.S. Saving Rate," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(3), pages 113-25, Summer.
  9. Michael P. Dooley & David Folkerts-Landau & Peter Garber, 2003. "An Essay on the Revived Bretton Woods System," NBER Working Papers 9971, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Schnabl, Gunther & Zemanek, Holger, 2011. "Inter-Temporal Savings, Current Account Dynamics and Asymmetric Shocks in a Heterogeneous European Monetary Union," Annual Conference 2011 (Frankfurt, Main): The Order of the World Economy - Lessons from the Crisis 48685, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  11. Gunther Schnabl, 2011. "The role of the chinese dollar peg for macroeconomic stability in China and the world economy," Global Financial Markets Working Paper Series 13-2010, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  12. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
  13. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2010. "Rescuing Europe," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 11(SPECIALIS), pages 1-22, 08.
  14. Gunther Schnabl & Franziska Schobert, 2009. "Global Asymmetries In Monetary Policy Operations: Debtor Central Banks Of The Mena Region," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 77(s1), pages 85-107, 09.
  15. Feldstein, Martin, 2008. "Resolving the Global Imbalance: The Dollar and the U.S. Saving Rate," Scholarly Articles 2792081, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  16. Ronald McKinnon & Gunther Schnabl, 2009. "The Case for Stabilizing China's Exchange Rate: Setting the Stage for Fiscal Expansion," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 17(1), pages 1-32.
  17. Christophe Hurlin & Baptiste Venet, 2008. "Financial Development and Growth: A Re-Examination using a Panel Granger Causality Test," Working Papers halshs-00319995, HAL.
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