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The Viability of a Voting System that Allocates Parliamentary Seats According to Life Expectancy: An analysis using OLG models

  • Oguro, Kazumasa
  • Ishida, Ryo

This paper constructs an overlapping generations model in order to demonstrate low political intervention and interaction in the working and retired generations affect the allocation rate in future growth-stimulating public investment and the public pension. It also analyzes the possibility of moving to a voting system that allocates parliamentary seats according to life expectancy. The presented results suggest the following three main findings. Firstly, the voting system is important when population demographics change. Declining birthrates and an aging population may shorten the temporal perspective for policymaking over time. Any theoretical transition from the current voting system to a voting system that allocates parliamentary seats according to life expectancy would thus lengthen the temporal perspective for policymaking, potentially increasing the public investment rate and improving the utilities of the working and future generations. Secondly, when age-based voting turnout disparity is high, the shift from the current voting system to one based on life expectancy and region or life expectancy and age is possible. Thirdly, if both transitions from the current system are possible, moving to the latter would offer greater possibility for increasing the utilities of the working generation and future generations than moving to the former.

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File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/23241/1/DP571.pdf
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Paper provided by Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series CIS Discussion paper series with number 571.

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Length: 28 p.
Date of creation: Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hit:cisdps:571
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  1. Alesina, A. & Drazen, A., 1991. "Why Are Stabilizations Delayed?," Papers 6-91, Tel Aviv - the Sackler Institute of Economic Studies.
  2. Makoto Hirazawa & Koji Kitaura & Akira Yakita, 2010. "Aging, fertility, social security and political equilibrium," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 559-569, March.
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  4. Friedrich Breyer & Ben Craig, 1995. "Voting on social security: evidence from OECD countries," Working Paper 9511, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  5. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
  6. Oguro, Kazumasa & Shimasawa, Manabu & Aoki, Reiko & Oshio, Takashi, 2010. "Demographic Change, Intergenerational Altruism, and Fiscal Policy : A Political Economy Approach," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 493, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  7. Rogoff, Kenneth, 1990. "Equilibrium Political Budget Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(1), pages 21-36, March.
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  9. Marcello D'Amato & Vincenzo Galasso, 2009. "Political Intergenerational Risk Sharing," CSEF Working Papers 216, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  10. Tabellini, Guido & Alesina, Alberto, 1990. "Voting on the Budget Deficit," Scholarly Articles 4553030, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  11. Alberto Alesina & Roberto Perotti & José Tavares, 1998. "The Political Economy of Fiscal Adjustments," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(1), pages 197-266.
  12. Alesina, Alberto Francesco & Perotti, Roberto & Tavares, Jose, 1998. "The Political Economy of Fiscal Adjustments," Scholarly Articles 12553724, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  13. Ihori, Toshihiro & Itaya, Jun-ichi, 2001. "A dynamic model of fiscal reconstruction," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 779-797, November.
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  15. Martial Foucault & Thierry Madies & Sonia Paty, 2008. "Public spending interactions and local politics. Empirical evidence from French municipalities," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 57-80, October.
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