IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The asymmetric spatial effects for eastern and western regions of Russia

  • Olga A. Demidova


    (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

The purpose of this study is to identify the spatial effects of the main macroeconomic indicators of the eastern and western regions of Russia. These regions differ significantly in population density and the distances between cities. The main research question we are interested in is the following: how are events occurring in one of the western regions, such as economic growth or a decrease in the unemployment rate, effecting similar indicators in other western and eastern regions. The spatial effects of the western and eastern regions, when considered separately, may differ both qualitatively and with of the ‘flow on effect’. The determinants of the same macro-economic indicators in the eastern and western regions may also differ. In order to test the hypothesis of a possible difference in the spatial effects and determinants for these regions, we have developed a special class of model with four spatial matrices (west-west, east-east, west-east, and east-west) and a double set of control variables (one for each type of region). As the macroeconomic indicators monitor the rate of unemployment in the region, the real regional wage and GRP growth for the year were chosen for our models. We controlled the variables describing the socio-demographic situation in the region, migration processes, economic development, and export-import activity in the region. The models were estimated by the Arellano-Bond method on panel data for Russian regions over 2000-2010. Our analysis revealed, 1) a positive spatial correlation of the main macroeconomic indicators for the western regions, 2) both positive and negative externalities for the eastern regions and 3) the asymmetric influence of eastern and western regions on each other. Usually “impulses” from the western regions have a positive effect on the eastern regions, but the “impulses” from the eastern regions usually do not affect the western regions.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by National Research University Higher School of Economics in its series HSE Working papers with number WP BRP 50/EC/2014.

in new window

Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: 2014
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in WP BRP Series: Economics / EC, February 2014, pages 1-17
Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:50/ec/2014
Contact details of provider: Postal: Myasnitskaya 20, Moscow 101000
Phone: +7(495)7713232
Fax: +7(495)6287931
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Rima Izem & Nicola Fuchs-Schuendeln, 2007. "Explaining the Low Labor Productivity in East Germany - A Spatial Analysis," 2007 Meeting Papers 378, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Konstantin Kholodilin & Alexei Oshchepkov & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2009. "The Russian regional convergence process: Where does it go?," KOF Working papers 09-216, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  3. Olivier Parent & James Lesage, 2005. "Bayesian Model Averaging for Spatial Econometric Models," Post-Print hal-00375489, HAL.
  4. Olga Demidova & Marcello Signorelli, 2012. "Determinants of youth unemployment in Russian regions," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 191-217, January.
  5. Mark D. Partridge & Marlon Boarnet & Steven Brakman & Gianmarco Ottaviano, 2012. "Introduction: Whither Spatial Econometrics?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 167-171, 05.
  6. Ye.A. Kolomak ( ), 2010. "Spatial externalities as a source of economic growth," Journal "Region: Economics and Sociology", Institute of Economics and Industrial Engineering of Siberian Branch of RAS, vol. 4.
  7. Oleg Lugovoy & Vladimir V. Dashkeyev & Ilya Mazaev & Denis Fomchenko & Albert Hecht, 2007. "Analysis of Economic Growth in Regions: Geographical and Institutional Aspect," Published Papers 5, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, revised 2007.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:50/ec/2014. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamil Abdulaev)

or (Victoria Elkina)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.