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Analysis of Economic Growth in Regions: Geographical and Institutional Aspect


  • Oleg Lugovoy

    (Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy)

  • Vladimir V. Dashkeyev

    (Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy)

  • Ilya Mazaev

    (Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy)

  • Denis Fomchenko

    (Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy)

  • Albert Hecht

    (Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy)


This study explores disparity in regional development in Russia and in Canada and role of geography in their development. In the first chapter analysis of the role of geographic, economic, and institutional factors in economic growth over 1996–2004 is presented. Additionally the issue of the interregional spatial interaction is analyzed, which is studied in the framework of the new economic geography. The second chapter devoted to the development of Canadian provinces and analyzes factors of provincial differences along with factors of migration in Canada over the period of 1991–2001.

Suggested Citation

  • Oleg Lugovoy & Vladimir V. Dashkeyev & Ilya Mazaev & Denis Fomchenko & Albert Hecht, 2007. "Analysis of Economic Growth in Regions: Geographical and Institutional Aspect," Published Papers 5, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, revised 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:gai:ppaper:5

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. McGuire, Martin, 1978. "A method for estimating the effect of a subsidy on the receiver's resource constraint: with an application to U.S. local governments 1964-1971," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 25-44, August.
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    6. Logan, Robert R, 1986. "Fiscal Illusion and the Grantor Government," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(6), pages 1304-1318, December.
    7. Robert P. Inman, 1989. "The Local Decision to Tax: Evidence from Large U.S. Cities," NBER Working Papers 2921, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Poterba, James M., 1995. "Balanced Budget Rules and Fiscal Policy: Evidence From the States," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 48(3), pages 329-36, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hagemann, Harald & Kufenko, Vadim, 2014. "The political Kuznets curve for Russia: Income inequality, rent seeking regional elites and empirical determinants of protests during 2011/2012," Violette Reihe: Schriftenreihe des Promotionsschwerpunkts "Globalisierung und Beschäftigung" 39/2013, University of Hohenheim, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Evangelisches Studienwerk.
    2. Alexeev, Michael & Chernyavskiy, Andrey, 2015. "Taxation of natural resources and economic growth in Russia's regions," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 317-338.
    3. Gluschenko, Konstantin, 2010. "Methodologies of Analyzing Inter-Regional Income Inequality and Their Applications to Russia," MPRA Paper 66824, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Michael Alexeev & Yao-Yu Chih, 2017. "Oil Price Shocks and Economic Growth in the Us," Caepr Working Papers 2017-011 Classification-Q, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
    5. H. Lehmann & M. G. Silvagni, 2013. "Is There Convergence of Russia’s Regions? Exploring the Empirical Evidence: 1995 – 2010," Working Papers wp901, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    6. Olga A. Demidova, 2014. "The asymmetric spatial effects for eastern and western regions of Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 50/EC/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    7. Levoshko, Tamila, 2017. ""Pork-Barrel"-Politik und das regionale Wirtschaftswachstum. Empirische Evidenz für die Ukraine und Polen," Working Papers 0642, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    8. Elena Vakulenko, 2016. "Does migration lead to regional convergence in Russia?," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 9(1), pages 1-25.
    9. Michael Alexeev & Andrey Chernyavskiy, 2014. "Natural Resources And Economic Growth In Russia’s Regions," HSE Working papers WP BRP 55/EC/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    10. Ksenia Gonchar & Tatyana Ratnikova, 2012. "Explaining the Productivity Advantages of Manufacturing Firms in Russian Urban Agglomerations," HSE Working papers WP BRP 22/EC/2012, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    11. Vera Ivanova, 2015. "How Space Channels Wage Convergence: The Case of Russian Cities," HSE Working papers WP BRP 120/EC/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    12. Stepan Zemtsov & Vyacheslav Baburin, 2016. "Assessing the Potential of Economic-Geographical Position for Russian Regions," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(1), pages 117-138.

    More about this item


    economic growth; economic geography; spatial econometrics;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)


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