IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Introduction: Whither Spatial Econometrics?

Listed author(s):
  • Mark D. Partridge
  • Marlon Boarnet
  • Steven Brakman
  • Gianmarco Ottaviano

No abstract is available for this item.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9787.2012.00767.x
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Journal of Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 52 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (05)
Pages: 167-171

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:52:y:2012:i:2:p:167-171
DOI: j.1467-9787.2012.00767.x
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-4146

Order Information: Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0022-4146

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Stephen Gibbons & Henry G. Overman, 2012. "Mostly Pointless Spatial Econometrics?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 172-191, 05.
  2. Dan S. Rickman & Shane D. Rickman, 2011. "Population Growth In High‐Amenity Nonmetropolitan Areas: What'S The Prognosis?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(5), pages 863-879, December.
  3. Daniel P. McMillen, 2010. "Issues In Spatial Data Analysis," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 119-141.
  4. Daniel C. Monchuk & Dermot J. Hayes & John A. Miranowski & Dayton M. Lambert, 2011. "Inference Based On Alternative Bootstrapping Methods In Spatial Models With An Application To County Income Growth In The United States," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(5), pages 880-896, December.
  5. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
  6. J. Keith Ord & Arthur Getis, 2001. "Testing for Local Spatial Autocorrelation in the Presence of Global Autocorrelation," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 411-432.
  7. Boarnet Marlon G., 1994. "The Monocentric Model and Employment Location," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 79-97, July.
  8. Luisa Corrado & Bernard Fingleton, 2012. "Where Is The Economics In Spatial Econometrics?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 210-239, 05.
  9. Irani Arraiz & David M. Drukker & Harry H. Kelejian & Ingmar R. Prucha, 2010. "A Spatial Cliff-Ord-Type Model With Heteroskedastic Innovations: Small And Large Sample Results," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 592-614.
  10. Case, Anne C. & Rosen, Harvey S. & Hines, James Jr., 1993. "Budget spillovers and fiscal policy interdependence : Evidence from the states," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 285-307, October.
  11. James P. LeSage & R. Kelley Pace, 2008. "Spatial Econometric Modeling Of Origin-Destination Flows," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(5), pages 941-967.
  12. Thomas J. Holmes, 2010. "Structural, Experimentalist, And Descriptive Approaches To Empirical Work In Regional Economics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 5-22.
  13. In Kwon Park & Burkhard von Rabenau, 2011. "Disentangling Agglomeration Economies: Agents, Sources, And Spatial Dependence," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(5), pages 897-930, December.
  14. Monchuk, Daniel C. & Hayes, Dermot J. & Miranowski, John A & Lambert, Dayton M., 2011. "Inference Based on Alternative Bootstrapping Methods in Spatial Models with an Application to County Income Growth in the United States," ISU General Staff Papers 201103240700001526, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  15. Daniel P. McMillen, 2012. "Perspectives On Spatial Econometrics: Linear Smoothing With Structured Models," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 192-209, 05.
  16. Joris Pinkse & Margaret E. Slade, 2010. "The Future Of Spatial Econometrics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 103-117.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:52:y:2012:i:2:p:167-171. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing)

or (Christopher F. Baum)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.