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Income support systems, labour supply incentives and employment – some cross-country evidence

  • Anders, Forslund

    ()

    (IFAU)

  • Fredriksson, Peter

    ()

    (Uppsala Center for Labor Studies)

This paper summarizes a set of expert reports commissioned by the IFAU. The expert reports cover Estonia, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. These countries represent range of welfare states, both in terms of scope and design. And in each country there are interesting experiences from which other countries may learn. The overall objective is to identify policy tools that help generate sustained increases in employment in the long run. Therefore, we focus on policies that improve the incentives for labour force participation and reduce the barriers to participation.

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File URL: http://www.ucls.nek.uu.se/digitalAssets/136/136454_20103.pdf
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Paper provided by Uppsala University, Department of Economics in its series Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies with number 2010:3.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 15 Dec 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:uulswp:2010_003
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Uppsala University, P. O. Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala, Sweden
Phone: + 46 18 471 25 00
Fax: + 46 18 471 14 78
Web page: http://www.nek.uu.se/
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  1. Ek, Susanne & Holmlund, Bertil, 2010. "Family Job Search, Wage Bargaining, and Optimal Unemployment Insurance," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2010:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  2. Larsson, Laura & Runeson, Caroline, 2007. "Moral hazard among the sick and unemployed: evidence from a Swedish social insurance reform," Working Paper Series 2007:8, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  3. Dolton, Peter & O'Neill, Donal, 1996. "Unemployment Duration and the Restart Effect: Some Experimental Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(435), pages 387-400, March.
  4. Caliendo, Marco, 2009. "Income support systems, labor market policies and labor supply: the German experience," Working Paper Series 2009:26, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  5. Havnes, Tarjei & Mogstad, Magne, 2009. "Money for Nothing? Universal Child Care and Maternal Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 4504, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Annette Bergemann & Regina Riphahn, 2011. "Female labour supply and parental leave benefits - the causal effect of paying higher transfers for a shorter period of time," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 17-20.
  7. Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan & David A. Wise, 2010. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment, pages 1-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    • Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2004. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation, pages 1-40 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Kluve, Jochen, 2006. "The Effectiveness of European Active Labor Market Policy," RWI Discussion Papers 37, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (RWI).
  9. Gautier, Pieter A. & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2009. "Institutions and labor market outcomes in the Netherlands," Working Paper Series 2009:28, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  10. Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan & David A. Wise, 2009. "Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: The Relationship to Youth Employment, Introduction and Summary," NBER Working Papers 14647, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Selin, Håkan, 2009. "The Rise in Female Employment and the Role of Tax Incentive. An Empirical Analysis of the Swedish Individual Tax Reform of 1971," Working Paper Series, Center for Fiscal Studies 2009:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  12. Michael Baker & Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2005. "Universal Childcare, Maternal Labor Supply, and Family Well-Being," NBER Working Papers 11832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Florence Jaumotte, 2003. "Female Labour Force Participation: Past Trends and Main Determinants in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 376, OECD Publishing.
  14. Kluve, Jochen, 2006. "The Effectiveness of European Active Labor Market Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 2018, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Lundin, Daniela & Mörk, Eva & Öckert, Björn, 2008. "How far can reduced childcare prices push female labour supply?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 647-659, August.
  16. Forslund, Anders, 2009. "Labour supply incentives, income support systems and taxes in Sweden," Working Paper Series 2009:30, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  17. Brewer, Mike, 2009. "How do income-support systems in the UK affect labour force participation?," Working Paper Series 2009:27, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  18. Brugiavini, Agar, 2009. "Welfare reforms and labour supply in Italy," Working Paper Series 2009:29, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
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