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Specialization in Higher Education and Economic Growth

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  • von Greiff, Camilo

    () (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm University)

Abstract

This paper presents a new market failure in the decision on educational type in higher education. Individuals choose types of education with different degrees of specialization. Labor market transformation makes some individuals opt for a non-specialized education type that broadens the future career possibilities in an uncertain labor market. However, the growth rate in the economy is assumed to positively depend on the amount of specialized workers that get a job within their specialized field. Imposing a tax and transfer scheme in favor of specialized education types may correct for the market failure and Pareto improve the economy if the transfer attracts a sufficiently large amount of new students to a specialized education type and if their effect on the growth rate is substantial.

Suggested Citation

  • von Greiff, Camilo, 2007. "Specialization in Higher Education and Economic Growth," Research Papers in Economics 2007:13, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sunrpe:2007_0013
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    File URL: http://www2.ne.su.se/paper/wp07_13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1994. "The Division of Labor, Coordination Costs, and Knowledge," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 299-322 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. McMahon, Walter W., 1984. "The relation of education and R&D to productivity growth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 299-313, August.
    3. Creedy, John & Francois, Patrick, 1990. "Financing higher education and majority voting," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 181-200, November.
    4. Mills, Terence C & Pelloni, Gianluigi & Zervoyianni, Athina, 1995. "Unemployment Fluctuations in the United States: Further Tests of the Sectoral-Shifts Hypothesis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 294-304, May.
    5. S. Lael Brainard & David M. Cutler, 1993. "Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Unemployment Reconsidered," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 219-243.
    6. Loungani, Prakash & Rush, Mark & Tave, William, 1990. "Stock market dispersion and unemployment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 367-388, June.
    7. Alstadsæter, Annette & Kolm, Ann-Sofie & Larsen, Birthe, 2005. "Tax Effects of Unemployment and the Choice of Educational Type," Research Papers in Economics 2005:4, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    8. Romer, Paul M, 1987. "Growth Based on Increasing Returns Due to Specialization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 56-62, May.
    9. Lilien, David M, 1982. "Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 777-793, August.
    10. Greenaway, David & Upward, Richard & Wright, Peter, 2000. "Sectoral Transformation and Labour-Market Flows," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 57-75, Autumn.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational Choice; Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid

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