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Sectoral Transformation and Labour-Market Flows

Author

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  • Greenaway, David
  • Upward, Richard
  • Wright, Peter

Abstract

This paper examines the pattern of sectoral transformation that has occurred in the United Kingdom in the post-war period and documents the flows of workers that have occurred between industrial and services sectors and the non-employment that has resulted. It then examines what consequences sectoral transformation has had for wages and unemployment, both at the aggregate and the individual level. It concludes by examining the policy implications of its findings. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Greenaway, David & Upward, Richard & Wright, Peter, 2000. "Sectoral Transformation and Labour-Market Flows," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 57-75, Autumn.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:16:y:2000:i:3:p:57-75
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    Cited by:

    1. Larch Mario & Lechthaler Wolfgang, 2011. "Comparative Advantage and Skill-Specific Unemployment," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-58, April.
    2. Marius Brülhart & Robert J. R. Elliott & Joanne Lindley, 2006. "Intra-Industry Trade and Labour-Market Adjustment: A Reassessment Using Data on Individual Workers," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(3), pages 521-545, October.
    3. Robert J. R. Elliott & Joanne Lindley, 2006. "Skill Specificity And Labour Mobility: Occupational And Sectoral Dimensions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 74(3), pages 389-413, June.
    4. Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Mileva, Mariya, 2013. "Trade liberalization and wage inequality: New insights from a dynamic trade model with heterogeneous firms and comparative advantage," Kiel Working Papers 1886, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. von Greiff, Camilo, 2007. "Specialization in Higher Education and Economic Growth," Research Papers in Economics 2007:13, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    6. Ronald Bachmann & Michael C. Burda, 2010. "Sectoral Transformation, Turbulence and Labor Market Dynamics in Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11, pages 37-59, February.
    7. Saeed Rasekhi & Saman Ghaderi, 2013. "Marginal Intra-Industry Trade and Employment Reallocation: The Case Study of Iran’s Manufacturing Industries," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 417-429, September.
    8. Wolfgang Lechthaler & Mariya Mileva, 2014. "Smoothing the adjustment to trade liberalization," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 61, WWWforEurope.
    9. Girma, Sourafel & Wakelin, Katharine, 2001. "Regional Underdevelopment: Is FDI the Solution? A Semiparametric Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 2995, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Roberto Leombruni & Roberto Quaranta, 2002. "The Unemployment Route to Versatility," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 16, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    11. Bernard Hoekman & Alan L. Winters, 2005. "Trade and Employment: Stylized Facts and Research Findings," Working Papers 7, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    12. Ulf Lewrick & Lukas Mohler & Rolf Weder, 2014. "When firms and industries matter: understanding the sources of productivity growth," BIS Working Papers 469, Bank for International Settlements.
    13. Petri Böckerman & Kari Hämäläinen & Mika Maliranta, 2004. "Sources of Job and Worker Flows: Evidence from a Panel of Regions," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(1), pages 105-129, March.
    14. R J R Elliott & J Lindley, 2003. "Trade, Skills and Adjustment Costs: A Study of Intra-Sectoral Labour Mobility in the UK," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0312, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    15. Manuel Cabral & Joana Silva, 2006. "Intra-Industry Trade Expansion and Employment Reallocation between Sectors and Occupations," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(3), pages 496-520, October.

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