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How policy could handle workplace digitization

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While the brave new world of digital technology is delivering intensive growth to some companies and individuals, the question remains whether that growth ‘trickles down’ or ‘spills over’ to other sectors of the economy rapidly enough to avoid the massive social disruptions seen in earlier historical periods of economic transformation. In this short paper we discuss the potential labour market consequences of automation based on digital technology.

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File URL: http://ratio.se/app/uploads/2014/12/how-policy-could-handle-workplace-digitization.pdf
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Paper provided by The Ratio Institute in its series Ratio Working Papers with number 237.

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Length: 16 pages
Date of creation: 05 Dec 2014
Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0237
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  1. David Neumark & William L. Wascher, 2008. "Minimum Wages," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262141027, January.
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  6. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10093 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Tom Krebs & Martin Scheffel, 2013. "Macroeconomic Evaluation of Labor Market Reform in Germany," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 61(4), pages 664-701, December.
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  14. Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2000. "Beyond Computation: Information Technology, Organizational Transformation and Business Performance," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 23-48, Fall.
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  16. James J. Heckman & Alan B. Krueger, 2005. "Inequality in America: What Role for Human Capital Policies?," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262582600 edited by Benjamin M. Friedman, January.
  17. Tom Krebs & Martin Scheffel, 2013. "Macroeconomic Evaluation of Labor Market Reform in Germany," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 61(4), pages 664-701, December.
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