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The Impact of a Food For Education Program on Schooling in Cambodia

Author

Listed:
  • Cheung, Maria

    (Department of Economics)

  • Perotta, Maria

    (Institute for International Economic Studies, Stockholm University)

Abstract

Food for education (FFE) programs, which consist of meals served in school and in some cases take-home rations and deworming programs conditional on school attendance, are considered a powerful tool to improve educational out- comes, particularly in areas where school participation is initially low. Com- pared to other programs, such as conditional cash transfers and scholarships, school meals may provide a stronger incentive to attend school because chil- dren must be in school in order to receive the rations, and have the potential to improve nutritional and general health status as well. In this paper, we nd that the Cambodia FFE, that was implemented in six Cambodian regions be- tween 1999 and 2003, increased enrollment, school attendance and completed education. We also ask who bene ted the most, and how cost-e ective such a program is compared to other types of interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Cheung, Maria & Perotta, Maria, 2011. "The Impact of a Food For Education Program on Schooling in Cambodia," Seminar Papers 766, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:iiessp:0766
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Crea, Thomas M. & Neville, Sarah E. & Diaz-Valdes, Antonia & Evans, Kerri & Urizar, Brenda & Drummer, Emily & Acevedo, Jose & Canelas, Olga & Medina, Marlon & Mallman, Jennifer, 2021. "The McGovern-Dole food for education and Child nutrition program (MGD): A comparative analysis of reading comprehension gains in Central America," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 21(C).
    2. Cheung, Maria, 2012. "Edutainment Radio, Women's Status and Primary School Participation: Evidence from Cambodia," Research Papers in Economics 2012:5, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    3. Bui, Tuan Anh & Nguyen, Cuong Viet & Nguyen, Khuong Duc & Nguyen, Ha Hong & Pham, Phuong Thu, 2020. "The effect of tuition fee reduction and education subsidy on school enrollment: Evidence from Vietnam," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).
    4. Independent Evaluation Group, 2014. "Social Safety Nets and Gender : Learning from Impact Evaluations and World Bank Projects," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 21365.
    5. Pouirkèta Rita Nikiema, 2017. "Impact of school feeding programmes on educational outcomes: Evidence from dry cereals in schools in Burkina Faso," WIDER Working Paper Series 182, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Cousins, Mel, 2014. "Social Protection in the Mekong: policy trends and future directions," MPRA Paper 60026, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Pouirkèta Rita Nikiema, 2017. "Impact of school feeding programmes on educational outcomes: Evidence from dry cereals in schools in Burkina Faso," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-182, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    School meals; Primary education; Program evaluation; Cambodia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • O22 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Project Analysis
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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