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Double trouble: The burden of child rearing and working on maternal mortality

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  • Bucher-Koenen, Tabea

    (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging)

  • Farbmacher, Helmut

    (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging)

  • Guber, Raphael

    (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging)

  • Vikström, Johan

    (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

Abstract

We document increased old-age mortality rates among Swedish twin mothers compared to non-twin mothers. Results are based on administrative data on mortality for the years 1990 to 2010. We argue that twins are an unplanned shock to fertility in the cohorts of older women considered. Deaths due to lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart attacks, which are associated with stress during life, are significantly increased. Stratifying the sample by education and pension income shows the highest increase in mortality rates among highly educated mothers and those with above-median pension income. These results are consistent with the existence of a double burden from child rearing and working on mothers’ health.

Suggested Citation

  • Bucher-Koenen, Tabea & Farbmacher, Helmut & Guber, Raphael & Vikström, Johan, 2020. "Double trouble: The burden of child rearing and working on maternal mortality," Working Paper Series 2020:7, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2020_007
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    Cited by:

    1. XIE Mingjia & YIN Ting & ZHANG Yi & OSHIO Takashi, 2022. "The Hidden Cost of Having More Children: The Impact of Fertility on the Elderly's Healthcare Utilization," Discussion papers 22033, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. Öberg, Stefan, 2018. "Instrumental variables based on twin births are by definition not valid (v.3.0)," SocArXiv zux9s, Center for Open Science.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mortality; maternal health; fertility; twins;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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