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Diabetes morbidity after displacement

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Abstract

We investigate how career disruptions in terms of job loss may impact morbidity for individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Combining unique, high-quality longitudinal data from the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) with matched employer-employee data, we focus on individuals diagnosed with T2D, who are established on the labor market and who lose their job in a mass layoff. Using a conditional Difference-in-Differences evaluation approach, our results give limited support for job loss having an impact on health behavior, diabetes progression and cardiovascular risk factors.

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  • Bergemann, Annette & Grönqvist, Erik & Guðbjörnsdóttir, Soffia, 2018. "Diabetes morbidity after displacement," Working Paper Series 2018:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2018_015
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job displacement; Health; Diabetes; Unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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