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Losing Work, Moving On: International Perspectives on Worker Displacement


  • Peter J. Kuhn
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)


This volume presents a collaborative effort by 22 labor economists who examine worker displacement and the attempts to address it in 10 industrialized countries. Using large nationally-representative data sets and detailed policy analysis, the authors focus on two key questions related to worker displacement: 1) whether the experiences of displaced workers in the Untied States, and the patterns of experiences across workers, echo patterns seen in other developed countries, and 2) what can be learned, both from the similarities and from the differences across countries?

Suggested Citation

  • Peter J. Kuhn (ed.), 2002. "Losing Work, Moving On: International Perspectives on Worker Displacement," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number lwmo, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:lwmo Note: PDF is the book's first chapter.

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Maria Cancian & Robert Haveman & Thomas Kaplan & Daniel Meyer, 1999. "Work, Earnings, and Well-Being after Welfare: What Do We Know?," JCPR Working Papers 73, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    2. M. Robin Dion & LaDonna Pavetti, "undated". "Access to and Participation in Medicaid and the Food Stamp Program: A Review of the Recent Literature," Mathematica Policy Research Reports bfdebd22c4ea47a9a95b33409, Mathematica Policy Research.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. William J. Carrington, 2015. "Do We Know Why Earnings Fall with Job Displacement? Working Paper: 2015-01," Working Papers 49908, Congressional Budget Office.
    2. Leombruni, Roberto & Razzolini, Tiziano & Serti, Francesco, 2013. "The pecuniary and non-pecuniary costs of job displacement—The risky job of being back to work," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 205-216.
    3. Heather Antecol & Peter Kuhn & Stephen J. Trejo, 2006. "Assimilation via Prices or Quantities?: Sources of Immigrant Earnings Growth in Australia, Canada, and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(4).
    4. José Arranz & Carlos García-Serrano, 2014. "Duration and Recurrence of Unemployment Benefits," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 271-295, September.
    5. Michael W. L. Elsby & Jennifer C. Smith & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2011. "The role of worker flows in the dynamics and distribution of UK unemployment," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 338-363.
    6. Léa Toulemon & Lexane Weber-Baghdiguian, 2016. "Long-term Impact of Job Displacement on Job Quality and Satisfaction: Evidence from Germany," Working Papers halshs-01418183, HAL.
    7. Amynah Vanessa Gangji & Robert Plasman, 2007. "The Matthew effect of unemployment: how does it affect wages in Belgium," DULBEA Working Papers 07-19.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    8. Lepage-Saucier, Nicolas, 2016. "The consumption response to temporary layoffs and hours losses," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 177-193.
    9. J. Meekes & W.H.J. Hassink, 2016. "The role of the housing market in workers’ resilience to job displacement after firm bankruptcy," Working Papers 16-10, Utrecht School of Economics.
    10. Nyström, Kristina & Viklund Ros, Ingrid, 2014. "Exploring regional differences in the regional capacity to absorb displacements," Ratio Working Papers 235, The Ratio Institute.
    11. Jakob von Weizsäcker & Etienne Wasmer, 2007. "A better Globalisation Fund," Policy Briefs 36, Bruegel.
    12. Marcus Eliason & Donald Storrie, 2009. "Does Job Loss Shorten Life?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(2).
    13. Meekes, Jordy & Hassink, Wolter, 2017. "The Role of the Housing Market in Workers' Resilience to Job Displacement after Firm Bankruptcy," IZA Discussion Papers 10894, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Carrington, William J. & Fallick, Bruce C., 2014. "Why Do Earnings Fall with Job Displacement?," Working Paper 1405, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    15. Léa Toulemon, 2016. "Job quality, Health Insurance and the Price of Medical Products: Essays in Applied Economics," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/3018m4nhj18, Sciences Po.
    16. Appelqvist Jukka, 2007. "Wage and Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers in Finland," Discussion Papers 422, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    17. repec:eee:touman:v:39:y:2013:i:c:p:37-49 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. repec:psl:pslqrr:2017:21 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. José M. Arranz & Carlos García-Serrano & María A. Davia, 2010. "Worker Turnover And Wages In Europe: The Influence Of Unemployment And Inactivity," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(6), pages 678-701, December.

    More about this item


    worker displacement; displaced workers; dislocated workers; worker dislocation;

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs


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