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Job Loss, Firm?Level Heterogeneity and Mortality: Evidence from Administrative Data

Author

Listed:
  • Bloemen, Hans

    () (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

  • Hochguertel, Stefan

    () (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

  • Zweerink, Jochem

    () (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of job loss on mortality for older male workers with strong labor force attachment. Using Dutch administrative data, we find that job loss due to sudden firm closure increased the probability to die within five years by a sizable 0.60 percentage points. Importantly, this effect is estimated using a model that controls for firm-level worker characteristics, such as firm-level average mortality rates for mortality during the four years prior to the year of observation. On the mechanism driving the effect of job loss on mortality, we provide evidence for an effect running through stress and changes in life style.

Suggested Citation

  • Bloemen, Hans & Hochguertel, Stefan & Zweerink, Jochem, 2015. "Job Loss, Firm?Level Heterogeneity and Mortality: Evidence from Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 9483, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9483
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Xavier Pautrel, 2018. "Environmental Policy and Health in the Presence of Labor Market Imperfections," TEPP Working Paper 2018-09, TEPP.
    2. Bergemann, Annette & Grönqvist, Erik & Guðbjörnsdóttir, Soffia, 2018. "Diabetes morbidity after displacement," Working Paper Series 2018:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Gonçalves, Judite & Martins, Pedro S., 2018. "The effect of self-employment on health: Instrumental variables analysis of longitudinal social security data," GLO Discussion Paper Series 245, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    treatment effect; mortality; job loss;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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