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Effects of Brand-Fit Music on Consumer Behavior: A Field Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov

    (HUI Research)

  • Rudholm, Niklas

    (HUI Research)

  • Sporre, Hampus

    () (HUI Research)

Abstract

Businesses might use music to align consumers with brand values, thereby influencing consumers' choices and perceptions. However, previous studies have focused on the effects of various characteristics of the music choice (e.g., tempo and style) and not on the effect of the congruence between music and brand values. Our cooperation with Soundtrack Your Brand, the exclusive provider of Spotify Business, makes it possible for us to test the effect of congruence between music and brand values on consumers in a field experiment using 16 chain restaurants within the Stockholm metropolitan area. Our results show that a playlist that only includes brand-fit songs increases revenues by 9.1 percent in comparison to selecting music that does not fit the brand. We also find that brand-fit music has a positive impact on consumers' emotions and that music seems to have an unconscious effect on consumers.

Suggested Citation

  • Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov & Rudholm, Niklas & Sporre, Hampus, 2017. "Effects of Brand-Fit Music on Consumer Behavior: A Field Experiment," HUI Working Papers 121, HUI Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:huiwps:0121
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov & Moradi, Jasmine & Rudholm, Niklas & Öberg, Christina, 2019. "Effects of employees’ opportunities to influence in-store music on sales: Evidence from a field experiment," HFI Working Papers 4, Institute of Retail Economics (Handelns Forskningsinstitut).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer choice; store atmospherics; food consumption; brand values; emotions; self-control.;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism
    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing

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