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Putting decomposition of energy use and pollution on a firm footing - clarifications on the residual, zero and negative values and strategies to assess the performance of decomposition methods

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  • Muller, Adrian

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

I show how the problems with zero and negative values in decomposition can in principle be resolved by avoiding ill-defined mathematical operations used to derive the decomposition formulae (division by zero and taking logarithms of zero and negative values). Referring to integral approximation, which is the basis of any decomposition analysis, I also discuss the residual in decomposition and show that the presence of a non-zero residual is natural and that requiring a zero residual as a strategy to identify optimal decomposition methods is without basis. To nevertheless advise on optimal decomposition methods, I suggest to investigate for which types of functions different decomposition methods are exact or good approximations and how they perform in simulations, where the exact integrals are known. Regarding these criteria the LMDI seems to perform best.

Suggested Citation

  • Muller, Adrian, 2006. "Putting decomposition of energy use and pollution on a firm footing - clarifications on the residual, zero and negative values and strategies to assess the performance of decomposition methods," Working Papers in Economics 215, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 10 Aug 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0215
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/2700
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ang, B. W., 2004. "Decomposition analysis for policymaking in energy:: which is the preferred method?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1131-1139, June.
    2. Trivedi, P K, 1981. "Some Discrete Approximations to Divisia Integral Indices," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(1), pages 71-77, February.
    3. Ang, B.W., 1995. "Decomposition methodology in industrial energy demand analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 20(11), pages 1081-1095.
    4. B. W. Ang & Ki-Hong Choi, 1997. "Decomposition of Aggregate Energy and Gas Emission Intensities for Industry: A Refined Divisia Index Method," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 59-73.
    5. Sun, J. W., 1998. "Changes in energy consumption and energy intensity: A complete decomposition model," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 85-100, February.
    6. Chung, Hyun-Sik & Rhee, Hae-Chun, 2001. "A residual-free decomposition of the sources of carbon dioxide emissions: a case of the Korean industries," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 15-30.
    7. Muller, Adrian, 2006. "Putting decomposition of energy use and pollution on a firm footing - clarifications on the residual, zero and negative values and strategies to assess the performance of decomposition methods," Working Papers in Economics 213, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 10 Aug 2007.
    8. Ang, B.W. & Liu, F.L., 2001. "A new energy decomposition method: perfect in decomposition and consistent in aggregation," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 537-548.
    9. Boyd, Gale A. & Hanson, Donald A. & Sterner, Thomas, 1988. "Decomposition of changes in energy intensity : A comparison of the Divisia index and other methods," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 309-312, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Muller, Adrian, 2006. "Clarifying Poverty Decomposition," Working Papers in Economics 217, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 17 Nov 2008.
    2. Åsa Löfgren & Adrian Muller, 2010. "Swedish CO 2 Emissions 1993–2006: An Application of Decomposition Analysis and Some Methodological Insights," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 47(2), pages 221-239, October.
    3. Monjon, Stéphanie & Quirion, Philippe, 2011. "Addressing leakage in the EU ETS: Border adjustment or output-based allocation?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 1957-1971, September.
    4. Quentin Perrier & Philippe Quirion, 2016. "La transition énergétique est-elle favorable aux branches à fort contenu en emploi ? Une approche input-output pour la France," Policy Papers 2016.02, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    5. Stéphanie Monjon & Philippe Quirion, 2010. "Addressing leakage in the EU ETS : Border adjustment or output-based allocation ?," Working Papers hal-00866444, HAL.
    6. Carlino, Laurent & Coppens, François & González, Javier & Ortega, Manuel & Pérez-Duarte, Sébastien & Rubbrecht, Ilse & Vennix, Saskia, 2017. "Decomposition techniques for financial ratios of European non-financial listed groups," Statistics Paper Series 21, European Central Bank.
    7. Muller, Adrian, 2006. "Putting decomposition of energy use and pollution on a firm footing - clarifications on the residual, zero and negative values and strategies to assess the performance of decomposition methods," Working Papers in Economics 215, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 10 Aug 2007.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    decomposition analysis; Divisia Index; logarithmic mean; energy consumption; emissions;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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