IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/has/discpr/1526.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Grid and shake - Spatial aggregation and robustness of regionally estimated elasticities

Author

Listed:
  • Gabor Bekes

    (Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and CEPR)

  • Peter Harasztosi

    (National Bank of Hungary)

Abstract

This paper proposes a simple method measuring spatial robustness of estimated coefficients and considers the role of administrative districts and regions' size. The procedure, dubbed "Grid and Shake", offers a solution for a practical empirical issue, when one compares a variables of interest across spatially aggregated units, such as regions. It may, for instance, be applied to investigate competition, agglomeration, spillover effects. The method offers to (i) have carry out estimations at various levels of aggregation and compare evidence, (ii) treat uneven and non-random distribution of administrative unit size, (iii) have the ability to compare results on administrative and artificial units, and (iv) be able to gouge statistical significance of differences. To illustrate the method, we use Hungarian data and compare estimates of agglomeration externalities at various levels of aggregation. We find that differences among estimated elasticities found at various levels of aggregation are broadly in the same range as those found in the literature employing various estimation method. Hence, the method of spatial aggregation seems to be of equal importance to modeling and econometric specification of the estimation.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabor Bekes & Peter Harasztosi, 2015. "Grid and shake - Spatial aggregation and robustness of regionally estimated elasticities," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 1526, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:1526
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://econ.core.hu/file/download/mtdp/MTDP1526.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ciccone, Antonio, 2002. "Agglomeration effects in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 213-227, February.
    2. Ali Hortaçsu & Chad Syverson, 2007. "Cementing Relationships: Vertical Integration, Foreclosure, Productivity, and Prices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 250-301.
    3. Giulio Cainelli & Sandro Montresor & Giuseppe Vittucci Marzetti, 2014. "Spatial agglomeration and firm exit: a spatial dynamic analysis for Italian provinces," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 213-228, June.
    4. Giorgio Gobbi & Francesca Lotti, 2004. "Entry Decisions and Adverse Selection: An Empirical Analysis of Local Credit Markets," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 26(3), pages 225-244, December.
    5. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon & Sébastien Roux, 2010. "Estimating Agglomeration Economies with History, Geology, and Worker Effects," NBER Chapters, in: Agglomeration Economics, pages 15-66, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Pierre‐Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon & Diego Puga & Sébastien Roux, 2012. "The Productivity Advantages of Large Cities: Distinguishing Agglomeration From Firm Selection," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(6), pages 2543-2594, November.
    7. Gilles Duranton & Henry G. Overman, 2008. "Exploring The Detailed Location Patterns Of U.K. Manufacturing Industries Using Microgeographic Data," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 213-243, February.
    8. Briant, A. & Combes, P.-P. & Lafourcade, M., 2010. "Dots to boxes: Do the size and shape of spatial units jeopardize economic geography estimations?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 287-302, May.
    9. Acs, Zoltan J. & Armington, Catherine, 2004. "The impact of geographic differences in human capital on service firm formation rates," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 244-278, September.
    10. Hans Bacher & Marius Brülhart, 2013. "Progressive taxes and firm births," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(1), pages 129-168, February.
    11. A S Fotheringham & D W S Wong, 1991. "The Modifiable Areal Unit Problem in Multivariate Statistical Analysis," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 23(7), pages 1025-1044, July.
    12. Sergey Lychagin & Joris Pinkse & Margaret E. Slade & John Van Reenen, 2016. "Spillovers in Space: Does Geography Matter?," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 295-335, June.
    13. Ciccone, Antonio & Hall, Robert E, 1996. "Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 54-70, March.
    14. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    15. Pe'er, Aviad & Vertinsky, Ilan, 2008. "Firm exits as a determinant of new entry: Is there evidence of local creative destruction?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 280-306, May.
    16. Adelheid Holl, 2004. "Transport Infrastructure, Agglomeration Economies, and Firm Birth: Empirical Evidence from Portugal," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(4), pages 693-712, November.
    17. Békés, Gábor & Harasztosi, Péter, 2013. "Agglomeration premium and trading activity of firms," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 51-64.
    18. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Duranton, Gilles & Gobillon, Laurent, 2008. "Spatial wage disparities: Sorting matters!," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 723-742, March.
    19. Martin-Barroso, David & Nuñez Serrano, Juan Andres & Velazquez, Francisco J., 2010. "A different look at aglomeration effects in Spain," MPRA Paper 33601, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2010.
    20. Rosenthal, Stuart S. & Strange, William C., 2008. "The attenuation of human capital spillovers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 373-389, September.
    21. Gergely Csorba & Gabor Koltay & David Farkas, 2011. "Separating the ex post effects of mergers: an analysis of structural changes on the Hungarian retail gasoline market," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 1118, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
    22. Vinod Sutaria & Donald A. Hicks, 2004. "New firm formation: Dynamics and determinants," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 38(2), pages 241-262, June.
    23. Melo, Patricia C. & Graham, Daniel J. & Noland, Robert B., 2009. "A meta-analysis of estimates of urban agglomeration economies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 332-342, May.
    24. Martijn J. Burger & Frank G. van Oort & Bert van der Knaap, 2010. "A Treatise on the Geographical Scale of Agglomeration Externalities and the MAUP," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 9(1), pages 19-39.
    25. Luc Anselin, 2010. "Thirty years of spatial econometrics," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(1), pages 3-25, March.
    26. Ganesh Iyer & P. Seetharaman, 2008. "Too close to be similar: Product and price competition in retail gasoline markets," Quantitative Marketing and Economics (QME), Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 205-234, September.
    27. Catherine Armington & Zoltan Acs, 2002. "The Determinants of Regional Variation in New Firm Formation," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 33-45.
    28. Martin Andersson & Johan Klaesson & Johan P Larsson, 2014. "The sources of the urban wage premium by worker skills: Spatial sorting or agglomeration economies?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(4), pages 727-747, November.
    29. Abadie, Alberto & Diamond, Alexis & Hainmueller, Jens, 2010. "Synthetic Control Methods for Comparative Case Studies: Estimating the Effect of California’s Tobacco Control Program," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 105(490), pages 493-505.
    30. John Dewhurst & Philip McCann, 2007. "Specialization and Regional Size," Chapters, in: Bernard Fingleton (ed.), New Directions in Economic Geography, chapter 7, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Békés, Gábor & Horváth, Áron & Sápi, Zoltán, 2016. "Lakóingatlanárak és települési különbségek [Housing prices and location differences]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(12), pages 1289-1323.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Gábor Békés & Péter Harasztosi, 2018. "Grid and shake: spatial aggregation and the robustness of regionally estimated elasticities," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 60(1), pages 143-170, January.
    2. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Gobillon, Laurent, 2015. "The Empirics of Agglomeration Economies," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 247-348, Elsevier.
    3. Marion Drut & Aurélie Mahieux, 2017. "Correcting agglomeration economies: How air pollution matters," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96(2), pages 381-400, June.
    4. J. Meekes & W.H.J. Hassink, 2018. "Endogenous local labour markets, regional aggregation and agglomeration economies," Working Papers 18-03, Utrecht School of Economics.
    5. Marion Drut & Aurélie Mahieux, 2014. "Correcting agglomeration economies: How air pollution matters," Working Papers hal-01007019, HAL.
    6. Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M. & Pietrostefani, Elisabetta, 2019. "The economic effects of density: A synthesis," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 93-107.
    7. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon, 2011. "The identification of agglomeration economies," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 253-266, March.
    8. Martin, Philippe & Mayer, Thierry & Mayneris, Florian, 2011. "Spatial concentration and plant-level productivity in France," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 182-195, March.
    9. Paul Verstraten & Gerard Verweij & Peter Zwaneveld, 2018. "Why do wages grow faster in urban areas? Sorting of high potentials matters," CPB Discussion Paper 377, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    10. Paul Verstraten & Gerard Verweij & Peter Zwaneveld, 2018. "Why do wages grow faster in urban areas? Sorting of high potentials matters," CPB Discussion Paper 377.rdf, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    11. Gilles Duranton & Diego Puga, 2020. "The Economics of Urban Density," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 3-26, Summer.
    12. Chauvin, Juan Pablo & Glaeser, Edward & Ma, Yueran & Tobio, Kristina, 2017. "What is different about urbanization in rich and poor countries? Cities in Brazil, China, India and the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 17-49.
    13. Graham, Daniel J. & Gibbons, Stephen, 2019. "Quantifying Wider Economic Impacts of agglomeration for transport appraisal: Existing evidence and future directions," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 1-1.
    14. Steven Brakman & Charles van Marrewijk, 2013. "Reflections on cluster policies," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 6(2), pages 217-231.
    15. Békés, Gábor & Harasztosi, Péter, 2013. "Agglomeration premium and trading activity of firms," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 51-64.
    16. Adelheid Holl, 2014. "Location, accessibility and firm-level productivity in Spain," Chapters, in: Ana Condeço-Melhorado & Aura Reggiani & Javier Gutiérrez (ed.), Accessibility and Spatial Interaction, chapter 10, pages 195-210, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Tanaka, Kiyoyasu & Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro, 2017. "Agglomeration economies in the formal and informal sectors : a Bayesian spatial approach," IDE Discussion Papers 666, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    18. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Duranton, Gilles & Gobillon, Laurent & Roux, Sébastien, 2012. "Sorting and local wage and skill distributions in France," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 913-930.
    19. Behrens, Kristian & Mion, Giordano & Murata, Yasusada & Suedekum, Jens, 2017. "Spatial frictions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 40-70.
    20. Di Addario, Sabrina & Vuri, Daniela, 2010. "Entrepreneurship and market size. The case of young college graduates in Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 848-858, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic geography; firm productivity; agglomeration premium; spatial grid randomization;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:has:discpr:1526. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/iehashu.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Nora Horvath (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/iehashu.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.