IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ham/qmwops/21101.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The emergence and spatial distribution of Chinese seaport cities

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Funke

    ()

  • Hao Yu

    ()

Abstract

Seaports have historically played a key role in facilitating trade and growth. This paper is the first attempt in the literature to analyse the formation of Chinese seaport cities and the dynamics that drives it. First, we aim to identify theoretically the emergence of urbanized seaports with the help of a formal economic geography model. Second, employing an emperically plausible parameterisation of the model, we calibrate the evolutionary process and spacial distribution of seaports along the Chinese coastline.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Funke & Hao Yu, 2011. "The emergence and spatial distribution of Chinese seaport cities," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 21101, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ham:qmwops:21101
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.uni-hamburg.de/fachbereiche-einrichtungen/fb03/iwwt/makro/CHIECO.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Philippe Aghion & Diego Comin & Peter Howitt & Isabel Tecu, 2016. "When Does Domestic Savings Matter for Economic Growth?," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(3), pages 381-407, August.
    2. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2010. "When, Where, and Why? Early Industrialization in the Poor Periphery 1870-1940," NBER Working Papers 16344, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Sylvie Démurger & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Wing Thye Woo & Shuming Bao & Gene Chang & Andrew Mellinger, 2002. "Geography, Economic Policy, and Regional Development in China," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, pages 146-197.
    4. Fujita , Masahisa & Krugman, Paul, 2004. "The new economic geography: Past, present and the future," INVESTIGACIONES REGIONALES - Journal of REGIONAL RESEARCH, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 4, pages 177-206.
    5. Wolfgang Keller & Ben Li & Carol H. Shiue, 2011. "China’s Foreign Trade: Perspectives From the Past 150 Years," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(6), pages 853-892, June.
    6. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 2009. "The Economics of Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262012634, January.
    7. Kristian Behrens & Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 2011. "Tempora mutantur : in search of a new testament for NEG," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 215-230, March.
    8. Tetsu Kawakami & Masayuki Doi, 2004. "Port capital formation and economic development in Japan: A vector autoregression approach," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 83(4), pages 723-732, October.
    9. Nathan Nunn & Leonard Wantchekon, 2011. "The Slave Trade and the Origins of Mistrust in Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3221-3252, December.
    10. Christopher M. Anderson & Yong-An Park & Young-Tae Chang & Chang-Ho Yang & Tae-Woo Lee & Meifeng Luo, 2008. "A game-theoretic analysis of competition among container port hubs: the case of Busan and Shanghai 1," Maritime Policy & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 5-26, February.
    11. Kris James Mitchener & Se Yan, 2010. "Globalization, Trade & Wages: What Does History tell us about China?," NBER Working Papers 15679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Carol H. Shiue & Wolfgang Keller, 2007. "Markets in China and Europe on the Eve of the Industrial Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1189-1216.
    13. Demurger, Sylvie, 2001. "Infrastructure Development and Economic Growth: An Explanation for Regional Disparities in China?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 95-117, March.
    14. Fujita, Masahisa & Mori, Tomoya, 1996. "The role of ports in the making of major cities: Self-agglomeration and hub-effect," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 93-120, April.
    15. -, 2009. "Economic growth in the Caribbean," Sede Subregional de la CEPAL para el Caribe (Estudios e Investigaciones) 38668, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    16. Tetsu Kawakami & Masayuki Doi, 2004. "Port capital formation and economic development in Japan: A vector autoregression approach," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, pages 723-732.
    17. Mori, Tomoya & Nishikimi, Koji, 2002. "Economies of transport density and industrial agglomeration," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 167-200, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Seaport; cities; economic growth; China;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ham:qmwops:21101. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/imhamde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.