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Yu Hao

Personal Details

First Name:Yu
Middle Name:
Last Name:Hao
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pha930
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP)
Beijing Institute of Technology

Beijing, China
http://www.ceep.net.cn/

: 86-10-68918651
86-10-68918651

RePEc:edi:cebitcn (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Yu Hao & Hua Liao & Yi-Ming Wei, 2014. "Is China's carbon reduction target allocation reasonable? An analysis based on carbon intensity convergence," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 71, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.
  2. Yu Hao & Yi-Ming Wei, 2014. "When does the turning point in China's CO2 emissions occur? Results based on the Green Solow Model," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 73, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.
  3. Michael Funke & Hao Yu, 2011. "The emergence and spatial distribution of Chinese seaport cities," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 21101, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.
  4. Michael Funke & Hao Yu & Aaron Mehrota, 2011. "Tracking Chinese CPI inflation in real time," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 21112, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.
  5. Michael Funke & Hao Yu, 2009. "Economic Growth Across Chinese Provinces: In Search of Innovation-Driven Gains," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 20909, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Michael Funke & Aaron Mehrotra & Hao Yu, 2015. "Tracking Chinese CPI inflation in real time," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 1619-1641.
  2. Hao, Yu & Liao, Hua & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2015. "Is China’s carbon reduction target allocation reasonable? An analysis based on carbon intensity convergence," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 229-239.
  3. Zhang, Xian & Wang, Ke & Hao, Yu & Fan, Jing-Li & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2013. "The impact of government policy on preference for NEVs: The evidence from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 382-393.
  4. Funke, Michael & Yu, Hao, 2011. "The emergence and spatial distribution of Chinese seaport cities," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 196-209, June.

Chapters

  1. Hao Yu & Rong Han, . "China Country Report," Chapters, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Yu Hao & Hua Liao & Yi-Ming Wei, 2014. "Is China's carbon reduction target allocation reasonable? An analysis based on carbon intensity convergence," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 71, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.

    Cited by:

    1. Jian-Xin Wu & Ling-Yun He, 2016. "The distribution dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Emission intensity across Chinese provinces: A weighted Approach," Papers 1612.02658, arXiv.org.
    2. Jie Zhang & Lu Zhang, 2016. "Impacts on CO 2 Emission Allowance Prices in China: A Quantile Regression Analysis of the Shanghai Emission Trading Scheme," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-12, November.
    3. Francesch-Huidobro, Maria, 2016. "Climate change and energy policies in Shanghai: A multilevel governance perspective," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 45-56.
    4. Hao, Yu & Peng, Hui, 2017. "On the convergence in China's provincial per capita energy consumption: New evidence from a spatial econometric analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 31-43.
    5. Chang, Kai & Chang, Hao, 2016. "Cutting CO2 intensity targets of interprovincial emissions trading in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 211-221.
    6. Cheng, Zhonghua & Li, Lianshui & Liu, Jun, 2018. "Industrial structure, technical progress and carbon intensity in China's provinces," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 81(P2), pages 2935-2946.
    7. Wu, Jianxin & Wu, Yanrui & Guo, Xiumei & Cheong, Tsun Se, 2016. "Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in Chinese cities: A continuous dynamic distribution approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 207-219.
    8. Ping Wang & Bangzhu Zhu, 2016. "Estimating the Contribution of Industry Structure Adjustment to the Carbon Intensity Target: A Case of Guangdong," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(4), pages 1-11, April.
    9. Wang, Miao & Feng, Chao, 2017. "Decomposition of energy-related CO2 emissions in China: An empirical analysis based on provincial panel data of three sectors," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 772-787.
    10. Chen, Jiandong & Cheng, Shulei & Song, Malin & Wu, Yinyin, 2016. "A carbon emissions reduction index: Integrating the volume and allocation of regional emissions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 1154-1164.
    11. Ji, Xiang & Li, Guo & Wang, Zhaohua, 2017. "Allocation of emission permits for China’s power plants: A systemic Pareto optimal method," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 607-619.
    12. Zheng, Bo & Zhang, Qiang & Borken-Kleefeld, Jens & Huo, Hong & Guan, Dabo & Klimont, Zbigniew & Peters, Glen P. & He, Kebin, 2015. "How will greenhouse gas emissions from motor vehicles be constrained in China around 2030?," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 230-240.
    13. Wu, Ya & Zhang, Wanying, 2016. "The driving factors behind coal demand in China from 1997 to 2012: An empirical study of input-output structural decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 126-134.
    14. Fernández-Amador, Octavio & Oberdabernig, Doris & Tomberger, Patrick, 2017. "Testing for Convergence in Carbon Dioxide Emissions using a Bayesian Robust Structural Model," Papers 1101, World Trade Institute.
    15. Thomakos, Dimitrios D. & Alexopoulos, Thomas A., 2016. "Carbon intensity as a proxy for environmental performance and the informational content of the EPI," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 179-190.

  2. Yu Hao & Yi-Ming Wei, 2014. "When does the turning point in China's CO2 emissions occur? Results based on the Green Solow Model," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 73, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.

    Cited by:

    1. Hao, Yu & Peng, Hui, 2017. "On the convergence in China's provincial per capita energy consumption: New evidence from a spatial econometric analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 31-43.
    2. Hao, Yu & Liu, Yiming & Weng, Jia-Hsi & Gao, Yixuan, 2016. "Does the Environmental Kuznets Curve for coal consumption in China exist? New evidence from spatial econometric analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 1214-1223.
    3. Lu, Zhijian & Shao, Shuai, 2016. "Impacts of government subsidies on pricing and performance level choice in Energy Performance Contracting: A two-step optimal decision model," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 1176-1183.
    4. Liu, Yiming & Hao, Yu & Gao, Yixuan, 2017. "The environmental consequences of domestic and foreign investment: Evidence from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 271-280.
    5. Zhi-Fu Mi & Yi-Ming Wei & Bing Wang & Jing Meng & Zhu Liu & Yuli Shan & Jingru Liu & Dabo Guan, 2017. "Socioeconomic impact assessment of China's CO2 emissions peak prior to 2030," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 103, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.
    6. Wu, Ya & Zhang, Wanying, 2016. "The driving factors behind coal demand in China from 1997 to 2012: An empirical study of input-output structural decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 126-134.

  3. Michael Funke & Hao Yu & Aaron Mehrota, 2011. "Tracking Chinese CPI inflation in real time," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 21112, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Minghong Tan, 2014. "The Transition of Farmland Production Functions in Metropolitan Areas in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(7), pages 1-14, June.
    2. Bolan Liu & Xiaowei Ai & Pan Liu & Chuang Zhang & Xingqi Hu & Tianpu Dong, 2015. "Fuel Economy Improvement of a Heavy-Duty Powertrain by Using Hardware-in-Loop Simulation and Calibration," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-14, September.
    3. Chronis, George A., 2016. "Modelling the extreme variability of the US Consumer Price Index inflation with a stable non-symmetric distribution," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 271-277.

  4. Michael Funke & Hao Yu, 2009. "Economic Growth Across Chinese Provinces: In Search of Innovation-Driven Gains," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 20909, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Zao Sun & Chun-Ping Chang & Yu Hao, 2017. "Fiscal decentralization and China’s provincial economic growth: a panel data analysis for China’s tax sharing system," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, pages 2267-2289.
    2. Li, Kui-Wai & Liu, Tung, 2011. "Economic and productivity growth decomposition: An application to post-reform China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 366-373.

Articles

  1. Michael Funke & Aaron Mehrotra & Hao Yu, 2015. "Tracking Chinese CPI inflation in real time," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 1619-1641.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Hao, Yu & Liao, Hua & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2015. "Is China’s carbon reduction target allocation reasonable? An analysis based on carbon intensity convergence," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 229-239.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Zhang, Xian & Wang, Ke & Hao, Yu & Fan, Jing-Li & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2013. "The impact of government policy on preference for NEVs: The evidence from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 382-393.

    Cited by:

    1. Zhaohua Wang & Xiaoyang Dong, 2016. "Determinants and policy implications of residents’ new energy vehicle purchases: the evidence from China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, pages 155-173.
    2. Wenbo Li & Ruyin Long & Hong Chen & Jichao Geng, 2017. "Household factors and adopting intention of battery electric vehicles: a multi-group structural equation model analysis among consumers in Jiangsu Province, China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, pages 945-960.
    3. Sierzchula, William & Bakker, Sjoerd & Maat, Kees & van Wee, Bert, 2014. "The influence of financial incentives and other socio-economic factors on electric vehicle adoption," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 183-194.
    4. Wolf, Ingo & Schröder, Tobias & Neumann, Jochen & de Haan, Gerhard, 2015. "Changing minds about electric cars: An empirically grounded agent-based modeling approach," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 269-285.
    5. Han, Liu & Wang, Shanyong & Zhao, Dingtao & Li, Jun, 2017. "The intention to adopt electric vehicles: Driven by functional and non-functional values," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 185-197.
    6. Li, Wenbo & Long, Ruyin & Chen, Hong & Yang, Tong & Geng, Jichao & Yang, Muyi, 2018. "Effects of personal carbon trading on the decision to adopt battery electric vehicles: Analysis based on a choice experiment in Jiangsu, China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 478-488.
    7. Ma, Shao-Chao & Fan, Ying & Feng, Lianyong, 2017. "An evaluation of government incentives for new energy vehicles in China focusing on vehicle purchasing restrictions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 609-618.
    8. Wang, Shanyong & Li, Jun & Zhao, Dingtao, 2017. "The impact of policy measures on consumer intention to adopt electric vehicles: Evidence from China," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 14-26.
    9. Li, Wenbo & Long, Ruyin & Chen, Hong, 2016. "Consumers’ evaluation of national new energy vehicle policy in China: An analysis based on a four paradigm model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 33-41.
    10. She, Zhen-Yu & Qing Sun, & Ma, Jia-Jun & Xie, Bai-Chen, 2017. "What are the barriers to widespread adoption of battery electric vehicles? A survey of public perception in Tianjin, China," Transport Policy, Elsevier, pages 29-40.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

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