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Media and Political Participation in North Africa

Author

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  • Mathilde Maurel

    (FERDI - Fondation pour les Etudes et Recherches sur le Développement International, CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Charlemagne Nikiema

    (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

We examine the role of new decentralized media (the internet) vs old media (television) on individuals' political engagement in North Africa. Drawing our data from the Afrobarometer round 5 survey, we tackle issues of endogeneity by resorting first to a propensity score matching method to identify the effect of media on political participation. We then address endogeneity by relying to a bivariate probit model while using lightening activity as an instrument for media. The analysis evidences the political power of the internet and TV. Getting news from internet reduces voting but increases protests, while TV watching induces more vote and less protest. This effect is channeled through the impact of media on the perception about political institutions, which differs across the different media.

Suggested Citation

  • Mathilde Maurel & Charlemagne Nikiema, 2016. "Media and Political Participation in North Africa," Working Papers hal-01396055, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01396055
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.science/hal-01396055
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mathilde Maurel & Charlemagne Nikiema, 2016. "Media and Political Participation in North Africa," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01396055, HAL.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    North Africa; Political Participation; Media;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • F50 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - General
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • L96 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Telecommunications

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