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Migrants' Home Town Associations and Local Development in Mali

Author

Listed:
  • Lisa Chauvet

    (DIAL - Développement, institutions et analyses de long terme)

  • Flore Gubert

    (DIAL - Développement, institutions et analyses de long terme)

  • Marion Mercier

    () (PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

  • Sandrine Mesplé-Somps

    (DIAL - Développement, institutions et analyses de long terme)

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of Malian migrants' Home Town Associations (HTAs) located in France on the provision of local public goods in Mali. To this end, we compute an original dataset on all the HTAs that have been created by Malian migrants in France since 1981 and geo-localize their interventions on the Malian territory. Thanks to four waves of Malian census, we also build a panel dataset on the provision of a range of public goods in all Malian villages over the 1976-2009 period. These two sources of data allow us to implement a difference-in-differences strategy, and to compare villages with and without an HTA, before and after HTAs developed their activity in Mali. We find that Malian HTAs have significantly contributed to improve the provision of schools, health centers and water amenities over the 1987-2009 period. When looking at the timing of the treatment, we observe that the difference between treated and control villages in terms of water amenities is mainly driven by the second period of observation (1998-2009), while schools and health centers exhibit significant differences during the whole period.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa Chauvet & Flore Gubert & Marion Mercier & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2015. "Migrants' Home Town Associations and Local Development in Mali," Post-Print hal-01276827, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01276827
    DOI: 10.1111/sjoe.12100
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01276827
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dilip Ratha & Ani Silwal, 2012. "Remittance Flows in 2011 : An Update," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16176, The World Bank.
    2. Christophe Daum, 1995. "Les migrants, partenaires de la coopération internationale : Le cas des Maliens de France," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 107, OECD Publishing.
    3. Rachel Glennerster & Edward Miguel & Alexander D. Rothenberg, 2013. "Collective Action in Diverse Sierra Leone Communities," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0, pages 285-316, May.
    4. Claire Bernard & Lisa Chauvet & Flore Gubert & Marion Mercier & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2014. "La dynamique associative des Maliens de l’extérieur : enseignements tirés de deux dispositifs d’enquête originaux," Post-Print hal-01289401, HAL.
    5. Aparicio, Francisco Javier & Meseguer, Covadonga, 2012. "Collective Remittances and the State: The 3×1 Program in Mexican Municipalities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 206-222.
    6. Beauchemin, Cris & Schoumaker, Bruno, 2009. "Are Migrant Associations Actors in Local Development? A National Event-History Analysis in Rural Burkina Faso," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1897-1913, December.
    7. Devesh Kapur, 2010. "Diaspora, Development, and Democracy: The Domestic Impact of International Migration from India," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9202.
    8. Claire Bernard & Lisa Chauvet & Flore Gubert & Marion Mercier & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2014. "La dynamique associative des Maliens de l’extérieur : enseignements tirés de deux dispositifs d’enquête originaux‪," Post-Print halshs-01511031, HAL.
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    Cited by:

    1. Licuanan, Victoria & Omar Mahmoud, Toman & Steinmayr, Andreas, 2015. "The Drivers of Diaspora Donations for Development: Evidence from the Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 94-109.
    2. Calvo, Thomas & Lavallée, Emmanuelle & Razafindrakoto, Mireille & Roubaud, François, 2020. "Fear Not For Man? Armed conflict and social capital in Mali," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 251-276.
    3. Richard P.C. Brown & Gareth Leeves & Prabha Prayaga, 2014. "Sharing Norm Pressures and Community Remittances: Evidence from a Natural Disaster in the Pacific Islands," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(3), pages 383-398, March.
    4. Mireille Razafindrakoto & Nicolas Razafindratsima & Nirintsoa Razakamanana & François Roubaud, 2017. "La diaspora malagasy en France et dans le monde : une communauté invisible ?," Working Papers DT/2017/18, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    5. Flore Gubert, 2014. "The discourse and practice of co-development in Europe," Chapters, in: Robert E.B. Lucas (ed.), International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 5, pages 113-151, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Sandrine MESPLÉ-SOMPS & Bjorn NILSSON, 2020. "Les migrations internationales des Maliens," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 51, pages 133-143.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Local public goods; Mali; Biens publics locaux;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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