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Financial remittances, trans-border conversations, and the state

Author

Listed:
  • Meseguer, Covadonga
  • Lavezzolo, Sebastián
  • Aparicio, Javier

Abstract

How does the reception of remittances change the views of those left behind? In this paper, we compare the impact of financial remittances (transmission of money) with the impact of social remittances (transmission of ideas and values) on preferences about the role of the state in the economy (in particular, the role of the state in creating jobs, reducing inequality, and securing citizens’ well-being). Using data from the Latin American Public Opinion Project (2008–2010), we find that social learning via cross-border communication is positively associated with preference for an enhanced role of the state.

Suggested Citation

  • Meseguer, Covadonga & Lavezzolo, Sebastián & Aparicio, Javier, 2016. "Financial remittances, trans-border conversations, and the state," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68273, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:68273
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/68273/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Minh Tran, Ngoc Thi & Cameron, Michael P. & Poot, Jacques, 2017. "International Migration and Institutional Quality in the Home Country: It Matters Where You Go and How Long You Stay!," IZA Discussion Papers 10945, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration; remittance; social remittance; trans-nationalism; welfare state; Latin America; developing countries;

    JEL classification:

    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook

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