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Amenity, Diversity and Obesity: Unobserved Heretogeneity in Cities

Author

Listed:
  • Stephen Popick
  • Anthony M. Yezer

Abstract

Some sources of heterogeneity among cities, i.e. age, gender, race, income, and education, have been the object of substantial inquiry. The reasons are obvious. These differences are easily observed and may have important implications for economic activity. This study considers another potentially important population characteristic, obesity. Descriptive statistics reveal that the intercity variance in obesity rates is substantial. Empirical results demonstrate that demographic and regional amenity variables all have a relation to intercity differences in obesity. Because obesity is important for preferences, performance, and productivity, its omission from previous studies and its correlation with amenity and demographic characteristics, could create problems for empirical research.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Popick & Anthony M. Yezer, 2015. "Amenity, Diversity and Obesity: Unobserved Heretogeneity in Cities," Working Papers 2015-12, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2015-12
    as

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    File URL: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/2015WP/YezerIIEPWP201512.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eve Chiapello & A. Hurand, 2011. "Contribution," Post-Print hal-00681170, HAL.
    2. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-1278, December.
    3. Eid, Jean & Overman, Henry G. & Puga, Diego & Turner, Matthew A., 2008. "Fat city: Questioning the relationship between urban sprawl and obesity," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 385-404, March.
    4. Brennan Timothy J., 2014. "Behavioral economics and policy evaluation," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-21, January.
    5. Grossman, Michael & Tekin, Erdal & Wada, Roy, 2014. "Food prices and body fatness among youths," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 4-19.
    6. Charles L. Baum & William F. Ford, 2004. "The wage effects of obesity: a longitudinal study," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(9), pages 885-899.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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